homer simpson do it for her

Maggie Simpson, daughter of Homer and Marge Simpson, the baby of the family who rarely Maggie doesn't like spending time with her aunts Patty and Selma. Here are the worst things Homer Simpson has done to his loving wife. with her husband, which she feels she can't do without drinking. Maggie Simpson's special sound comes from her creator.Today. 4. The names Marge, Homer, Lisa, Maggie and Patty are all taken from creator.

Homer simpson do it for her -

Recap / The Simpsons S 6 E 13 And Maggie Makes Three

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"So you loved her right from the start?" "Absolutely."

Episode - 2F10
First Aired - 1/22/1995

During one of Marge's self-imposed, weekly family hours, the Simpsons are looking through the photo album. The kids notice that the album doesn't contain any pictures of Maggie, which prompts a Whole Episode Flashback about the events leading up to the youngest Simpson's birth.

Some time in the last two years, Homer has finally saved up enough money working at the Springfield Nuclear Power Plant to quit; he does so grandly, mocking Mr. Burns and even burning up a wooden bridge as he drives from the building. He then gets his "dream job" at Barney's uncle's bowling alley, explaining to Marge that he's worked out a budget that will allow the family to get by so long as nothing unexpected happens. To celebrate, Homer and Marge have a romantic evening together...

In a few weeks, Marge is suffering from morning sickness, and a visit to Dr. Hibbert reveals that she is pregnant. While she quickly tells her children, she's much more reluctant to share the news with Homer, especially after he thanks God for his life being perfect just as it is. Instead, Marge turns to her sisters, who are delighted to hear the news—and even more delighted to learn that Homer would be devastated if he found out about the pregnancy. Marge makes Patty and Selma promise not to tell Homer; instead, they call up the biggest gossips in Springfield, who are quick to spread the word. The Bouviers then arrange a baby shower for Marge right before Homer gets home from work. He finally pieces together what's happening, and throws a screaming fit.

Later that evening, Marge and Homer discuss the future: Homer knows that he can't possibly support a third child on his bowling alley paycheck. Marge suggests that he ask for a raise, and while his boss is willing to give it, the alley isn't making enough money to provide for one. Homer then tries to drum up business by wildly firing a gun outside the building and shouting at passerby. This plan fails, and also costs him his dream job. A reluctant Homer knows that there is only one place where he can find work, and goes back to the power plant. Mr. Burns decides to humiliate Homer even further by installing a bleak plaque above his old workstation: "DON'T FORGET: YOU'RE HERE FOREVER." Devastated, Homer returns home and complains to Marge, who tells him that she's begun having contractions.

At the hospital, Dr. Hibbert works to deliver the baby as Homer, still depressed, comments on the miracle of "another mouth." Even the child's birth can't rouse his spirits...until a tiny hand reaches out and grabs his thumb. He looks down at Maggie and immediately loves her, taking her into his arms and declaring her "the most beautiful baby girl in the whole world." While he and Marge kiss, Maggie, feeling neglected while mimicking them kissing, reaches off-screen and discovers a familiar pacifier.

Back in the present, Lisa is thrilled to hear that the story has a happy ending, but Bart is confused: Homer still hasn't told them why there aren't any pictures of Maggie in the family album. Homer explains that there are plenty of pictures, and that he keeps them "where he needs the most cheering up." The episode cuts to a shot of Homer's workstation, where the walls are plastered with dozens of photos of Maggie—along with the plaque, where they have been arranged to cover the letters to form a new message: "DO IT FOR HER."


This episode contain examples of:

  • And This Is for...: Played for Laughs when Homer quits his job at the power plant, he proceeds to literally do whatever he wants to Mr. Burns. Upon leaving, he remarks: "That's for employing me for eight years!"
  • Babies Make Everything Better: Marge's third pregnancy ruined Homer's plans for a dream job and future happiness, forcing him to take up work at the power plant again, and he made it no secret that he was miserable about the whole thing. What brought him out of his depression? Maggie's birth. The episode kicks off with Bart and Lisa noticing that Maggie has no baby pictures. At the end, Homer explains that they are where he needs them the most. Cut to his station at the power plant, decorated with pictures of Maggie. Mr. Burns put up a plaque reading "Don't Forget - You're Here Forever" when Homer was re-hired. The photos block out bits and pieces of this sign so it reads, "Do It For Her." This trope was also averted when we see how Homer lost his hair: whenever Marge announced that she was pregnant, Homer would rip out a handful of hair from his scalp and run upstairs screaming.
  • Bait-and-Switch: At least five examples:
    • After Homer quits his job and starts looking forward to his "dream job in paradise", we cut to Homer in what appears to be a tropical setting, complete with steel drum music. Then, he declares, "And now, the final phase of my plan," and it is revealed that he's actually at the bowling alley.
    • To celebrate Homer's new job, he and Marge go out for a romantic evening, with their first activity being dinner and dancing. We see a shot of a high-end restaurant and dance club district, implying that this is where they will spend their evening. Then the camera pans across town to a nearby Krusty Burger, where Homer and Marge are sitting in the drive-thru dancing to the radio.
    • When Patty and Selma decide to call people to tell them about Marge's pregnancy, they open a phone book and start making calls to someone named "A. Aaronson"; the scene fades to the phone book now on its last page, and the sisters saying goodbye to "Mr. Zowkowski," which implies that they've called everyone from A to Z. Patty then remarks that "Aaronson and Zowkowski are the biggest gossips in town," meaning that they only contacted two people.
    • When Homer decides to get a raise at the bowling alley:

      Homer: That's it, I'm going to march right up to Al and say —
      (Cut to Homer at the alley)
      Homer: Steve! I mean, Al!

    • When Homer tries to come up with an idea to attract more customers to Bowl-A-Rama, he's sitting over a table, reading books about marketting and staring at a bowling ball, until he finally seems to come up with a working idea: cue Jump Cut to Homer wildly firing a shotgun into the air in front of the bowling alley while yelling at people to "get their bowling here", as described below.
  • Bittersweet Ending: Homer ends the story with having to quit his dream job and go back to working at the plant with Burns putting up a plaque stating "Don't Forget, You're Here Forever" to crush what's left of his spirit. But when inquired why there's no baby pictures of Maggie, he states there are, just where he needs them most. And we see that that they're in his office, covering the plaque that the words now read "Do it for her".
  • Bond Gun Barrel: In the couch gag, Homer reenacts the James Bond gun barrel sequence, albeit in a bit bloody manner.
  • Bowling for Ratings: Homer quits his job at the Nuclear Power Plant to pursue his dream job at Barney's Bowlarama. Thanks to Maggie, it doesn't last long.
  • Captain Oblivious: Homer towards Marge's pregnancy. First, while Homer is returning home from the bowling alley, Chief Wiggum drives by and compliments him for his "nice work", which is vague enough for Homer to think he is talking about his new job. Then Apu congratulates Homer for the "little bundle of joy", which Homer surmises to be his salary. Next, Moe tells Homer in no uncertain terms that he got Marge pregnant, but Homer believes this is an abstract way of talking about his enjoyment of his job. When he reaches his home, he notices the neighbors have gathered there with presents. He infers that they're showering Marge with "little, tiny, baby-sized gifts", yet he still blows it all off. It isn't until Maude Flanders congratulates Homer on his new job when he finally realizes that Marge is pregnant with a third child.
  • Comically Missing the Point: Homer when the townspeople congratulate him for the new baby, which gets increasingly obvious.

    Moe: Hey, Homer! Way to get Marge pregnant. (laughs)
    Homer: This is getting very abstract, but thank you. I do enjoy working at the bowling alley.

  • Couch Gag: The living room is seen through the barrel of a gun like the intro to James Bond. Homer walks in and fires at the screen, which “bleeds” red and falls.
  • Crossing the Burnt Bridge: Homer literally drives across a wooden bridge and sets fire to it but later has to return to the Power Plant to get his job back after humiliating Burns on his way out.
  • Deranged Animation: Homer's head inflating and exploding.
  • Did Not Think This Through: Homer quits before he's certain he can get another job.
  • "Die Hard" on an X: Parodied (bear in mind, this is something Homer is imagining in the spur of the moment to lie about why there's no pictures of Maggie):

    German Terrorist: Attention, American workers: your plant has been taken over by an all-star team of freelance terrorists.
    Homer: Not on my shift! (jumps into an overhead vent, jumps out of another one and proceeds to kick terrorist ass singlehandedly while tied-up Lenny, Carl and Burns swoon over him).

  • The Ending Changes Everything: It isn't until the final few moments of the episode when the run-of-the-mill flashback episode, which shows Homer in a Jerkass light, turns into one of the most heartwarming episodes in the entire series.
  • Epic Fail: Homer's attempt to market bowling.
  • "Eureka!" Moment: Several people congratulate Homer because Marge had become pregnant with Maggie. Homer, himself unaware of the pregnancy, misinterprets these comments (even the ridiculously direct ones) as regarding his new job.note That's "ridiculously direct", as in "Hey, Homer, way to get Marge pregnant!" "This is getting increasingly abstract, but yes, I do enjoy working at the bowling alley" Then Maude congratulates him on the new job, prompting Homer to respond, "New job? MARGE IS PREGNANT!?"
  • Evil Brit: One shows up in Homer's fantasy at the beginning.
  • Evil Is Petty: Burns forcing people coming to beg for their jobs to crawl through a tunnel infested with spiderwebs and dust (literally labeled "Supplicants") and bolting the "don't forget, you're here forever" plaque to the wall of Homer's station to "break what's left of your spirit".
  • Exact Words: Patty and Selma promise not to tell Homer and don't—instead, they tell Springfield's worst gossips, who tell everyone else. To twist the knife further, Patty and Selma even arrange a surprise baby shower for Marge—just before Homer comes home from work.
  • Failed a Spot Check: Homer doesn't get why Marge keeps vomiting every morning and doesn't even realize she's pregnant until Maude Flanders tells Homer, "Congratulations on your new job" (referring to his new job working at the bowling alley).
  • Freak Out: Homer has one after realizing Marge is pregnant with Maggie, giving out a Big "NO!", yelling hysterically and running upstairs. Marge reveals this isn't the first time this happened. When Bart was coming, he nearly tore off all his hair. When Lisa was on the way, he tore off the rest, both time ending with running upstairs while screaming.
  • Gossipy Hens: Aaronson and Zukowski, the two biggest gossips in Springfield.
  • Happiness In Minimum Wage: Homer cleared his debt from his house and first two kids, quit the power plant in grandiose fashion, and happily moved to a much lower paying job at a bowling alley. Shortly afterward, he found out Marge was pregnant with Maggie, which forced him to beg for his old job back.
  • Hypocritical Humor:
    • Homer celebrates quitting from the Power Plant and putting an end to "back-breaking labor" forever. He then gets a job at the bowling alley, which involves much more movement than his job at the plant ever did.
    • When Marge forces the family to spend time together instead of watching Knightboat.

    Marge: Besides, that backtalking boat sets a bad example.
    Bart: Sez you, woman.

  • Incurable Cough of Death: Joey does one when Homer says goodbye to him, implying their plan to visit California one day will likely never happen.
  • Indulgent Fantasy Segue: Homer's flashback begins with him sitting as his workstation, and then suddenly the power cuts out.

    Evil British Voice: Attention American workers, your plant has been taken over by an all-star team of freelance terrorists.
    Homer: Not on my shift!

  • Insane Troll Logic: When Bart and Lisa are talking about what gender the new baby (Maggie) will turn out to be:

    Lisa: I hope it's a girl.
    Bart: You know nothing about genetics, Lis: it goes boy note Bart Simpson, girl note Lisa Simpson, boy note new baby, girl.

  • Interfaith Smoothie: Homer bizarrely starts a prayer with "Dear Lord, the gods have been good to me".
  • Invisible Subtle Difference: When Marge looks through the family photo album:

    Marge: Here's Bart sleeping. Here he is dozing. Here he is after a visit from the sandman. Ooh, here's nappy time, Bart! Here's a cute one — he's all tuckered out.

  • It's All About Me: Zig-zagged with Homer.

    Homer: Aw, I've never been so miserable in all my life. But I can't take it out on Marge and the kids — I've gotta carry the burden all by myself. [walks in] Hi, honey, how are you?
    Marge: Well, actually —
    Homer: Aw, I can't go on with this charade any longer! I hate my job, I hate my life, and ever since I found out about this baby, there's been nothing but bad luck.
    Marge: My contractions started an hour ago.
    Homer: It's just in one ear and out the other with you, isn't it, Marge?

  • Its Pronounced Tropay:

    Mr. Burns: According to company policy, it is now customary to give you the plague.

    Smithers: Uh, actually sir, it's pronounced "plaque".

  • Kick the Dog:
    • "Don't forget; you're here forever." Homer changes the plaque to "Do it for her."
    • There's also Patty and Selma deliberately arranging for Homer to find out about Marge's pregnancy in the worst way possible; Marge even explicitly says that Homer learning from someone other than her would devastate him.
  • Leaning on the Fourth Wall:
    • As Homer begins the Whole Episode Flashback: "Listen carefully and my words will shape images as clear as any TV show."
    • Before the end of the second act, Bart and Lisa get up to leave, with Bart remarking "Dad, you can't expect us to sit here for 30 minutes straight" and Lisa deciding to get a snack and maybe go to the bathroom. Marge stays on the couch, but spends the break imagining all the products she'd like to buy.
  • Licked by the Dog: As Homer does a bad job of putting up a good front at the hospital, he gives a mock thumbs up. All of a sudden, a tiny hand grabs his thumb, which melts his heart.

    Marge: Homie, I think someone is saying hello.

  • Literal Metaphor: When Homer goes to the power plant to get his old job back, he's forced to crawl through a hole labeled "supplicants". He enters Mr. Burns's office on his hands and knees, dusty and coughing.

    Burns: So. Come crawling back, eh?
    Homer: Seems like the classy thing to do would be not to call attention to it.

  • Morally Ambiguous Doctorate: Doctor Hibbert gets a very dark moment when Marge goes to him about her pregnancy, and tells her that if the baby is unwanted, a healthy newborn can reach up to $50,000 on the black market... when Marge reacts in alarm, he covers himself by saying it was just a test.

    Hibbert: If you'd reacted any differently, you'd be in jail by now. Just a test! (he laughs nervously)

  • My Secret Pregnancy: Marge, by this time sporting a pretty obvious bump, makes her sisters promise not to tell Homer, because she wants to be the one to tell him, and she's nervous about how he's going to take it. They promise not to tell Homer. (But not the two biggest gossips in Springfield.)
  • Narrative Backpedaling: Marge does not let Homer get away with a single embellishment on the story:
    • Homer begins his story with him thwarting a terrorist attack at the power plant, but Marge forces him to tell the story straight.
    • When Homer insists his breakdown over Marge's pregnancy was a one-time thing, Marge halts the story to instigate flashbacks, showing he went nuts for all three pregnancies.
    • Not only did Homer's head not explode randomly, but his bottom's a little bigger.
    • A third instance of the trope was subverted when Homer told the family about his failed attempt to attract customers. Homer shot a rifle in the air while shouting "Bowling here!" Lisa asked Marge to make him "tell the story right" and Marge dejectedly explains "That's what really happened".
  • Negative Continuity: The two times Homer reacted to Marge being pregnant with Bart and Lisa were vastly different than what was shown on "I Married Marge"note 1.) Homer and Marge weren't married nor were they actually living together when they discovered that Marge was pregnant with Bart, 2.) They were in Dr. Hibbert's office, where Dr. Hibbert himself was the one who informed them that Marge was pregnant, and 3.) Homer yelled "D'oh!" so loudly that a man in traction felt bad for him and "Lisa's First Word."note  1.) Homer, Marge and Bart were living in an apartment on the Lower East Side of Springfield and 2.) When Marge first told Homer that she was pregnant again, he was actually happy about having another baby—at least until Bart flushed his car keys down the toilet
  • New Baby Episode: When Bart asks why there are no pictures of Maggie Homer tells the story of Maggie's birth. After paying off his debts, Homer quits his well paying job at the power plant and gets his dream job as a pin-monkey, but after Marge reveals she's pregnant with Maggie, Homer tries, and fails, to ramp up business at the bowling alley to get a raise, and is devastated when he has to beg Mr. Burns for his old job to make ends meet. At the very end, Homer reveals that Maggie's pictures are in his work station, to serve as inspiration as to why he still works at the plant.
  • No Good Deed Goes Unpunished: Barney succeeds in getting Homer a job at the bowling alley but gets instantly fired so Homer can take his place.
  • Noodle Incident: Al tells Homer to bring a spare pair of pants to work. When Homer asks why, Al says "When it happens, you'll know".
  • "Not Making This Up" Disclaimer: Homer trying to attract customers by firing a shotgun into the air while yelling "Bowling! Get your bowling here!" actually happened, despite being outlandish enough for Lisa to consider it an embellishment of the story. Considering he tried to do it earlier, you can't blame her for thinking that.

    Lisa: (After hearing the part about the shotgun) Mom make dad tell the story right!

    Marge: (Resigned tone) That's what really happened.

    Lisa: Oh...

  • Plot Tailored to the Party: Parodied, as the family watch Knight Boat, who's chasing a set of starfish poachers. As they reach land, the boat points out a convenient nearby canal, much to Bart and Lisa's annoyance.

    Lisa: Oh, every week, there's a canal.
    Bart: Or a fjord.
    Lisa: On an inlet.
    Homer: QUIET! I will not hear another word against the boat!

  • Pursue the Dream Job: Homer quit the Springfield Nuclear Power Plant to become a pin-monkey at the local bowling alley as soon as he got out of debt. Once he learned that Marge was pregnant with Maggie, however, he tried to get a raise by attracting more customers, but was ultimately forced to give up the job and go back to the power plant.
  • Series Continuity Error:
    • Homer runs past a framed picture of Lisa on the stairs, despite both instances being set before Lisa was even born!
    • Homer is shown working in his usual office at the power plant in the time before Maggie was born. However, Homer worked as a basic laborer/technician long after Maggie was born, and didn't get an office until he was made into the plant's safety inspector in "Homer's Odyssey."
    • Marge and Homer are depicted as living in their house on Evergreen Terrace when Marge was pregnant with Bart, even though "I Married Marge" and "Lisa's First Word" had respectively shown that the two were still living with Marge's mother when Bart was born, and that they didn't move into Evergreen Terrace until shortly before Lisa's birth.
    • Ruth Powers is one of the guests at Marge's baby shower, despite the fact that she didn't meet the Simpson family for the first time until she moved in near them, after Maggie's birth.
    • There's still a picture of Maggie on the wall during the flashbacks even though she hasn't been born yet.
  • Sexy Discretion Shot: Subverted in this scene after Homer and Marge spent a romantic evening celebrating their new life:

    Homer:[sighs] I love you, Marge.
    Marge: I love you too, Homey.
    Homer: Everything in our lives is finally perfectly balanced. I hope things stay exactly like this forever.
    Marge: Mm-hmm.
    [cut to several sperm with Homer's head racing to an egg, then to Homer demonstrating how they swim]
    Marge: Did you have to be so graphic?
    Homer: It's OK, Marge: they pave the way for this kind of filth in school.

  • Shoe Shine, Mister?: Homer works with a shoeshine boy called Joey in the bowling alley.
  • Shout-Out:
  • Soul-Crushing Desk Job: Homer is well established as hating his job as a safety inspector at the Nuclear Plant. He wants to work in a bowling alley. Funny that Homer happily trades his cushy job with a place where he has to work manually or deal with dirty shoes. Homer ecstatically quits, making sure Mr. Burns, the owner of the plant, knows how much Homer hated it. Then Marge realizes she's pregnant and Homer has to beg for his old, higher-paying job back. Mr. Burns re-hires him, but has a plaque mounted in Homer's small office that reads "Don't forget: You're here forever." Homer uses pictures of Maggie to cover letters in such a way that the plaque now reads: "Do it for her."
  • Sperm as People: Maggie's conception is depicted with a bunch of clumsy, Homer-headed sperm cells. Once one hits the ovum, we cut out of the flashback to Homer pantomiming a wriggling sperm as the others chew him out for the pointless gross detail.
  • Status Quo Is God: After finally earning enough money to pay off his bills, Homer quits his job at the Nuclear Plant and pursues his dream job at Barney's Bowlarama. Thanks to Maggie, Homer is forced to quit his dream job and get his old job at the Nuclear Plant back.
  • Swiss Cheese Security: Nobody at the plant stop Homer from driving Mr. Burns around while playing his head like a bongo drum.
  • Tempting Fate: Marge is worried about Homer quitting his cushy job at the nuclear plant to go and work at the bowling alley. To reassure her, he shows her a budget he's done, which will allow him to support the family comfortably "as long as nothing changes." Then Marge finds out she's pregnant again...
  • Tranquil Fury: Jokingly turned Up to Eleven when Homer plays Mr. Burns' head like a bongo drum:

    Burns:(Calmly) Oh, I should be resisting this but I'm paralysed with rage!

  • Trees into Toothpicks: Homer wonders what happens to bowling pins after they get swept away. It turns out an automated assembly line throws out the used pins and makes new ones out of one fully-grown tree each.
  • Unreliable Narrator:
    • Homer begins the story with him singlehandedly taking down a terrorist raid on the plant before Marge intervenes and makes him tell the real story.
    • Bart hijacks the story and causes Homer's head to explode. Homer takes over and has to be corrected about his missing head and gut size.
    • Lisa accuses Homer of this when he tells them about his brilliant marketing strategy involving randomly firing a shotgun into the air. Marge laments that's what really happened.
  • Villainous Demotivator: Burns puts a literal one on the wall of Homer's workstation.
  • Visual Pun: After quitting the Power Plant, Homer sets fire to a bridge as he leaves.
  • Weird Weather: Homer is going back to the Nuclear Plant to get his old job back, having to give up his dream job of working in a bowling alley, in order to support his now five-member family. When he left the bowling alley, they gave him a satin jacket as a souvenir. As he trudges towards the plant, an acid rain shower hits him, disintegrating the jacket but leaving everything else untouched.

Источник: https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Recap/TheSimpsonsS6E13AndMaggieMakesThree

We Asked Experts for 10 of Their Most Memorable Simpsons Episodes of All Time

This week, The Simpsons celebrates its 30th anniversary of being on air. That’s three “D’oh-” and donut-filled decades of Homer’s mishaps alongside Marge, Bart, Lisa and Maggie as they scheme through the years in Springfield in brilliant cartoon color. The show has also picked up a collective 34 Primetime Emmy Awards over its expansive run, making it a critical hit too.

Despite the longevity of the series, none of the citizens of the Simpsons world have aged a day. But their comedy has grown up around us and become an indelible part of the American cultural landscape.

Sometimes, the show has seemed to tell the future. Other times, it has been a wry reflection of present and past.

Originally created as an offshoot of cartoon interludes on FOX’s Tracey Ullman Show by Matt Groening in 1987, it is developed by James L. Brooks, Matt Groening and Sam Simon.

To celebrate and consider the show’s hefty legacy, TIME spoke to three Simpsons scholars and experts who have written extensively about the show over the years, particularly about its lauded first decade. Journalist John Ortved, who wrote The Simpsons: An Uncensored, Unauthorized History, considers it one of our most powerful cultural forces in television. “I’d put The Simpsons right up there — I think it’s as or more powerful than Saturday Night Live,” he told TIME. Chris Turner, another journalist and author of Planet Simpson: How a Cartoon Masterpiece Defined a Generation, agrees. For Ray Richmond, critic and co-author of The Simpsons: A Complete Guide to Our Favorite Family, it’s one of the classics.

Most critics accept that the second half of the show’s run hasn’t hit its early subversive highs. But it still claims respect. “Even at its lowest, it’s been greater than almost every comedy,” Richmond says. The trick was that it took a traditional family sitcom and added the cartoon twist. “At its core it’s just a feel-good show about this wonderful family. It’s a combination of character development, great guest stars, sight gags and homages to the past and to films,” he explains of its longstanding appeal.” As for its future? “It will never go out.”

Here are ten of the most memorable of the show’s episodes according to those who have studied the iconic show over its run, focusing primarily on its acclaimed first 15 years.

10. “Rosebud,” Season 5, Episode 4. 1993.

This Citizen Kane homage gets into the backstory of Mr. Burns, recalling his beloved childhood teddy bear, Bobo, that he discarded in exchange for ascension to a life of wealth — and his lifelong quest to recover the treasured object. “It’s as perfect an episode of television as I’ve ever seen,” Ortved says. There are extensive historical references as Bobo’s journey is traced from Mr. Burns through the hands of Adolf Hitler and an expedition to the North Pole before miraculously ending up in the arms of Maggie, Homer’s daughter — leading, of course, to a Homer vs. Mr. Burns showdown. To top it off, there’s voice acting from the Ramones (yes, the rock star Ramones), adding an official layer of punk rock cool to the show. “On some level The Simpsons is a kind of punk rock TV show, or certainly was,” Ortved says. That irreverence has only enabled its long life.


9. “Cape Feare,” Season 5, Episode 2. 1993.

This is what Richmond calls the “ultimate Sideshow Bob episode.” It’s primarily a play on the Oscar-nominated 1991 movie Cape Fear, a psychological thriller from Martin Scorsese. In the Simpsons version, Homer and his family are terrorized by Homer’s nemesis Sideshow Bob, voiced by actor Kelsey Grammer; they end up entering the witness protection program and relocating to a new town and a houseboat to try to escape. But despite the dire context, they’re still able to mine plenty of comedy out of the circumstances. One of the most memorable parts of the episode is a comic bit that’s become Simpsons legend: Sideshow Bob keeps stepping onto rakes that continually whack him in the face. “It was one of those things where they were almost testing the theory that anything repeated enough becomes funny,” Turner says. “It becomes kind of repetitive and tedious, but by the seventh or eighth time it’s funny. It’s a comedic exercise.” And it worked.


8. “Homer’s Enemy,” Season 8, Episode 23. 1997.

This episode explores what happens when reality — or something like it — bumps up agains the Simpsons fantasy. In it, Mr. Burns hires a hard-working man named Frank Grimes to join the power plant. But when Grimes is stuck with Homer, he is driven to madness and, ultimately, death. “It’s quite dark,” admits Ortved, “but you and I laugh so hard, because you realize everyone in the Simpsons world has become so inured to Homer’s stupidity, gluttony and downright parasitic laziness. And you realize that these people have become not only OK with it, but charmed by it — and so have you.” Ortved calls it the “Hannah Arendt episode” for its wry portrayal of the banality of evil — a timeless term originally coined by the German-American theorist following the Holocaust. “Homer’s Enemy” also has its share of critics who see it as a bit too on the nose in its unusually clear-eyed depiction of Homer’s faults, making it one of the show’s more controversial episodes.


7. “El Viaje Misterioso de Nuestro Jomer (The Mysterious Voyage of Homer),” Season 8, Episode 9. 1997.

In this foray into a newly surrealist realm — or a “spirit quest acid trip,” as Turner describes it — Homer wins a hot-pepper-eating contest only to start hallucinating due to the strength of the peppers. While on his metaphysical journey, strange things happen; he shatters the sun, for instance. (“It’s one of the few old-school cartoon things they did in the show,” Turner recalls.) He also encounters a coyote spirit guide, voiced by country icon Johnny Cash. Ultimately, Homer’s quest leads him to question his relationship with Marge — but by the end of the episode, he has seen the light and re-confirmed Marge as his soulmate, a touching moment of romance in a show not always best known for its sensitivity to love. The unusual visuals in the animations make it particularly memorable in the show’s run.


6. “Deep Space Homer,” Season 5, Episode 15. 1993.

In this take on 2001: A Space Odyssey, Homer heads to the cosmos after being selected as an average-Joe astronaut to give NASA better ratings. In typical Homer fashion, he manages to mess up the navigational instruments with a smuggled bag of chips and unleashes an ant farm upon the shuttle, which he erroneously ends up believing are giant, alien ants. Predictably, mayhem and near-death mishaps ensue, although Homer is safely returned to earth. Memorably, astronaut Buzz Aldrin and rock star James Taylor make voice cameos. And as for the jokes? “It’s still got some of my favorite single lines in the show,” Turner says, and Richmond concurs that he’s still got a soft spot for the episode.


5. “Homer at the Bat,” Season 3, Episode 17. 1992.

In order to win a softball game, Mr. Burns hires major league baseball stars to staff up the company’s team. Notably, the Simpsons team managed to get the actual celebrities themselves to voice act their characters, from Roger Clemens to Ken Griffey Jr. “It’s amazing in retrospect that they managed to get these celebrity athletes,” explains Turner. “But the episode isn’t in thrall to whoever it is. It’s really held up.” Thanks to the nine players who contributed, it’s an iconic episode that showcases the power of the Simpsons‘s allure to draw in unusual cameos.


4. “The President Wore Pearls,” Season 15, Episode 3. 2003.

Clever, precocious Lisa becomes student body president of Fairfield Elementary School in this episode that parodies the opera Evita, with Lisa even singing a spin on “Don’t Cry For Me, Argentina” as she goes on to rule the school. “It’s a really careful and smart satire and tribute to a musical, a great exploration of Lisa,” Ortved explains, “and it gets into a character’s weakness and darker sides — and her hunger for power.” Beyond that, the episode is full of small jokes and gags that keep it memorable, including a cameo from filmmaker Michael Moore as himself. “It’s highly watchable, the songs are good, the pacing is great, and it has these wonderful moments that explore the tension between kids and adults,” he says. For instance, there’s a point at which Lisa, as president, has access to the teacher’s lounge. Awed by her power, the other students suggest the teachers must make fun of the kids in their private chamber. And sure enough, when Lisa peeks in on the teachers, she discovers Willie the groundskeeper making fun of the students — a cutting commentary on the cruelty of adults, as explored by a child. “There’s no single episode after that that holds up as well,” Ortved says.


3. “Treehouse of Horror V,” Season 6, Episode 6. 1994.

In their fifth installment of the annual — and much-loved — Halloween-themed “Treehouse of Horror” episode, the Simpsons creators parodied a number of famous scary stories to sharp comic effect. “The Shining,” which is the segment that’s most well-remembered, sees the family get hired by Mr. Burns to take care of his mansion. Homer quickly deteriorates under the circumstances, to murderous effect. Richmond says the Halloween episodes are “always a great highlight,” but this one stands out for the specificity of its homages — and the quality of the animation, for which The Simpsons doesn’t always get a lot of credit, but which improved by the time this episode came around. Turner agrees, calling the 3D animation a “huge deal at the time.” Besides its play on The Shining, there’s also an homage to the musical Sweeney Todd involving the students in the school cafeteria that delights in the macabre.


2. “The Itchy & Scratchy & Poochie Show,” Season 8, Episode 14. 1997

In this self-skewering episode, a popular kids’ show in the Simpsons’s universe — The Itchy & Scratchy Show — decides to make an attempt to inject fresh energy into its world with the addition of a new character, Poochie, to keep the attention of the audience. The show was not afraid to take a mirror to itself, with this episode as proof. “The Simpsons has always been good about tracing their own line, and commenting on their own success and their own failures,” Ortved notes. “The fact is, you can’t be that funny for that long, and comedy moves on. It’s a brilliant comment and takedown of popular television,” he says. “It’s both prescient and really critical.” Turner agrees: “It’s a satire of the show itself in a lot of ways. The discussion that leads to the invention of Poochie has to be the most cited criticism of bad TV writing.” At the end of the episode, the character of Poochie is summarily dispatched — a cautionary tale of how quick fixes to grab more eyeballs are not a true solution for waning attention in the entertainment industry.


1. “Marge vs. the Monorail,” Season 4, Episode 12. 1993.

In one of the show’s finest homages to classic theater, a traveling salesman named Lyle Lanley, voiced memorably by Phil Hartman, comes to Springfield and sells the town on the concept of a monorail, á la the musical The Music Man. The townspeople are quick to fall for his song-and-dance routine, and naturally Homer ends up as the conductor of the faulty — and highly unnecessary — new form of transportation. Written by Conan O’Brien, it’s a fast-paced, joke-filled episode that turns The Simpsons from a quirky sitcom into a surreal social critique.

“The voice of reason is completely thrown out the window for something quite funny and fun and imaginative,” explains Ortved, identifying the reason this episode stands out: “The Simpsons have always kept this kind of Aristotelian unity; they only did stuff that could happen in the real world, despite the fact they were a cartoon. And then all the sudden you have this whole thing that explores the imaginative possibilities of animation and the elasticity of the characters. The writers had to make their reaction to something this big make sense, which is a tribute to them.” From the musical numbers to a cameo from the legendary Leonard Nimoy (who plays himself, but with his role referencing Mr. Spock) to the comic spin on dangerous group psychology, it’s an eminently thoughtful episode that has stood up over time.

To stream some of the best episodes of The Simpsons included here, FXX kicks off a 15-day long marathon of 661 episodes of The Simpsons from the first 30 seasons starting Tuesday.

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Write to Raisa Bruner at [email protected]

Источник: https://time.com/5743465/best-simpsons-episodes/

The Simpsonshas been around longer than the internet, so it’s no surprise that the show has several memes devoted to it. The most famous is probably Homer backing into the bushes, which was so prolific it even ended up on an episode of The Simpsons. Another popular Simpsons meme is “Do it for her,” and there is a heartwarming story behind it. 

The Simpsons family all smiling except Bart

‘The Simpsons’ ‘Do it for her’ meme

According to Know Your Meme, the Simpsons “Do it for her” meme could be traced as far back as 2001, six years after the episode aired. Back then, Simpsons fans on message boards would share their feelings about “Do it for her,” and the episode made lists on IGN, VH1, Splitsider and No Homer’s Club.

The Simpsons baby Maggie plays with blocks

RELATED: ‘The Simpsons’ On Disney+: The Best HD Episodes to Watch Right Now

The base image shows Homer Simpson’s wall above his control panel at the Springfield nuclear power plant. There are spaces for blank photos, which in the original image contain Maggie Simpson. The pictures would cover a bulletin board so that the visible letters spell “Do it for her.” 

Know Your Meme says a March 20, 2006 deviantART user named ajfaggiani swapped the animated image of Maggie Simpson for his own daughter, and a friend named Javier. From 2011 to 2012, further parodies of “Do It For Her” appeared on Facebook and 4chan. There are now templates on sites like Meme.Market and Imgflip to help you make your own Simpsons do it for her meme, such as this Twitter user’s Playstation 5 homage: 

And this one about Tails from Sonic the Hedgehog, which added some new letters to make it read, “Do it for him’:

When did “And Maggie Makes Three” air?

“And Maggie Makes Three” was the 13th episode of The Simpsons’ sixth season, originally aired Jan. 25. It is a flashback episode in which Homer tells the story of when Maggie was born. At the time, the flashback went two years earlier to 1993. The season 32 episode “Do PizzaBots Dream of Electric Guitars,” aired March 14, 2021, had a flashback to the ’90s and Homer was a teenager, since that would be over 20 years ago from now. Maggie remains a baby here in 2021. 

The Simpsons -Homer and Grandpa Simpson stuck in the '90s

RELATED: ‘The Simpsons’ Breaks More Records with Season 33 and 34 Renewal

Homer’s story tells of how he quit the nuclear power plant and took a dream job at a bowling alley. When Marge gets pregnant a third time, his bowling alley job won’t cover a family of five. So, grudgingly, Homer has to beg Mr. Burns for his power plant job back, as viewers in 1995 could assume since he still worked there in the present day. 

Why does Homer Simpson do it for her?

Mr. Burns isn’t exactly magnanimous about taking Homer back. He puts up a big sign above the control panel reading “Don’t forget, you’re here forever.” 

RELATED: What It Means To Be A ‘Simpsons’ Fan For 30 Years

Homer uses photographs of baby Maggie to cover up the words so that it reads “Do it for her.” That, and the pictures of Maggie, remind Homer why he gave up his dream job.

Source: Know Your Meme

Источник: https://www.cheatsheet.com

The Worst Things Homer Ever Did To Marge On The Simpsons

The worst things Homer ever did to Marge on The Simpsons

20th Century Fox

By Ryan Ariano/Oct. 23, 2021 5:55 am EST

Homer Simpson is a lot of things to a lot of people. To his boss, he's lazy and dangerously incompetent. To his kids, he's neglectful, occasionally abusive (the whole "choking-his-son" thing), and sometimes affectionate, in his usual muddled way. To Moe the bartender, he's a top customer. To his friends, he's an occasional co-conspirator and more often a co-derelict. To his wife Marge, Homer is as loving as he can be, which at times doesn't seem like much. 

Homer Simpson is a slob and neglectful of his wife on his best days. Of course, in "The Simpsons," he's also a pater familias who delivers quite an amazing life full of excitement and adventure for his wife and kids.

That said, there are times when Homer mistreats Marge not as a side effect of his mush brain, but because he's selfish and thoughtless. Homer's bad acts range from betrayal and abandonment to embarrassment of his loving wife. Let's put it this way: If this were a real-life relationship, everybody would be cheering for Marge to leave the dopey schmuck and possibly press charges on the way out, no matter how much he loves her. Instead, no harm, no foul; we cheer for the Simpsons to continue their dysfunctional marriage for time eternal and for Homer to win her back with his regular grand acts of redemption.

Gave her a bowling ball for her birthday

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Marge has never shown an interest in bowling, so it's quite a gutter shot when Homer gives her a bowling ball for her birthday in Season 1, Episode 9 ("Life in the Fast Lane"). Homer is out supposedly shopping for Marge, but when he sees a bowling ball he would love himself, Homer buys it, gets his name engraved on it, and gives it to Marge, ostensibly thinking she won't like it and in turn will give it to Homer. Did we say that he actually put it in her birthday cake?

Such selfishness is par for Homer's course. But to so egregiously disrespect your loving, committed wife that you can't even get her a gift for her birthday is pretty horrible. Of course, Marge gets back at him by actually learning to bowl, eventually getting an instructor who gives Marge more than just lessons in bowling. She has a near-romance with the instructor, but eventually stays with her husband to honor their lifetime commitment of marriage. Hopefully, he learns from this that he must appreciate his wife. He learns from it, right? Right?

Framed her for his drunk driving

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Homer is far from a perfect husband, though most of his offenses within his marriage are crimes of omission, or due to his own shortcomings — basically, he has no malicious intent. But in Season 15, Episode 9's "Co-dependents Day," his actions seem downright villainous. He not only drags Marge down his own drunken path, but also frames her for his own drunk driving.

This is a huge betrayal. Homer has been drinking heavily, as always. This is a rare instance where Marge has also indulged. Homer flips their car while driving home. Fearing the repercussions, he switches seats with Marge. She goes to jail, he bails her out, but then Barney suggests she goes to rehab. Homer has been an alcoholic since the beginning of the series (and probably longer), yet Marge, largely a teetotaler, is the one to go to rehab. Homer of course can't watch the kids by himself, so he lets Flanders take care of them. In rehab, Marge discovers that she doesn't even have a drinking problem, she just wants to spend time with her husband, which she feels she can't do without drinking. That's a truly sad realization. 

Ruined a dinner party and their counseling

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In "The War of the Simpsons," the 20th episode of Season 2, Marge decides to have a dinner party, inviting all of their friends for what she hopes will be a great social event. Naturally, Homer gets drunk, makes a fool of himself and Marge, and ogles Maude Flanders. Marge is so embarrassed she enrolls them in a couples' therapy retreat.

What does Homer do at the retreat? He goes fishing. In fact, he plans to go fishing when he finds out where the retreat is, never really intending to put much into the counseling. Homer sneaks out and hooks a massive fish. Marge, of course, is forced to attend the workshops alone — just another sign that this marriage is, at best, one-sided.

Homer, who has pretty much never shown any interest in fishing, decides to go instead of working on his troubled marriage. This is after he ruined his wife's dinner party. Not exactly the actions of a good hubby. 

Married another woman in Vegas

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Often it seems that the only thing holding Homer and Marge together is their commitment made in the ceremony of marriage, so perhaps few of Homer's misdeeds are more disrespectful of Marge than when he gets married in Las Vegas. In Season 10, Episode 10, "Viva Ned Flanders," Homer and Ned go on a bender in Vegas and marry some trashy waitresses. Homer realizes his mistake, so perhaps it's okay that he simply got blackout drunk and married. He and Ned then run off, hoping that what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas.

All seems well until Homer's Vegas wife, Amber, shows up at their doorstep in Season 13's "Brawl in the Family." Homer never took the time to divorce her, so she shows up, embarrasses his first wife, and tears apart his family. Homer has a dream of what he could do with two wives: basically, they could both do chores for him. 

In the end, Marge helps him clean up the mess. Homer's excuse for this horrible act? Again, surprise, he was drunk.

Chloroformed her

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In Season 12, Springfield needs to adopt a new area code because they have too many phone numbers to all share the same area code. The second episode, "Tale of 2 Springfields," is centered on this development. Homer's reaction is to split the town. He shows up at a town meeting covered in dynamite he tries but fails to explode, basically acting like a terrorist and trying to kill everybody in town.

Toward the end, after The Who help the town reunite, Homer says he's glad Marge's crazy idea is over, even though the whole idea was his. When she goes to argue, he uses chloroform to knock her out. To sum up: Homer threatens their town, alienates his family (again) from all their friends for a stupid reason, blames Marge for his horrible actions, and then drugs her into silence so he can continue enjoying the party he really doesn't have much right to enjoy anyway.

Deceived her about his gun

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In "The Cartridge Family," the Simpson family takes on America's gun issue by showing us what it really means when everybody, including one of America's most alcoholic and irascible buffoons, can get a gun. In this episode of Season 9, Homer starts wielding a gun irresponsibly, to the point that Marge realizes the only thing she can do is take the kids and leave.

Following a burglary, Marge asks Homer to get an alarm system. Instead, he buys a gun, which he shows to her by pointing it at her face. Homer then "hides" the gun in a place where Bart is able to find it and he and Milhouse play William Tell. Marge tells Homer to choose between the gun or his family. Homer chooses his gun. Eventually, even the local chapter of the NRA, made up of many of Springfield's madmen (such as Moe showing how to make one gun out of five), decides Homer is too reckless to have a gun. Homer promises Marge he's gotten rid of the gun, but then reveals that he didn't actually get rid of it.

Got the town domed so they had to leave

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In "The Simpsons Movie," Homer not only harms Marge, but the rest of his family and the whole town of Springfield to boot. Homer wants to keep his pig, which he names Spider Pig. When Spider Pig relieves itself all over the yard, Homer decides to get rid of the waste by dropping it in a lake that's already dangerously polluted. This results in the town getting sequestered by a dome and essentially sentenced to death.

Homer manages to get his family out, but it also means that they're now separated from their friends and neighbors, who blame the family for the doming. Homer's selfish insistence on getting a pig leads him to take a shortcut, which leads to the family being forced to leave everybody and everything they know. This is one of the worst things Homer has done not only to Marge but to everybody else. She finally points this out, only for him to weasel his way back in.

Aired her secrets

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Homer likes to think that he knows things, even when he doesn't. In Season 5, Episode 22, "Secrets of a Successful Marriage," his friends make fun of him for being slow. He resents them when he finds Moe and Lenny teaching at the adult learning center.

When Homer gets a chance to teach a marriage class (despite the fact that his marriage is anything but exemplary), he jumps at it. As noted before, though, Homer is stupid, and his marriage is pretty bad. To keep the attention of his students, he tells his students secrets about his relationship, even airing plenty of Marge's secrets that have nothing to do with their marriage. When she discovers this, she kicks him out.

Why does she take him back in? Because, as Homer explains, he will be forever dependent on her. Homer betrays Marge's secrets and then explains that he's with her because he's unable to live by himself. Which, for some reason, she thinks is love.

Watched a whole season of their "show"

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Part of having a committed relationship these days is sharing the experience of watching a show together — and, when you have a free day, of bingeing it. There are maybe few betrayals short of infidelity worse than bingeing your and your partner's favorite show by yourself. Yet Homer does this in Season 30, Episode 13, "I'm Dancing As Fat As I Can."

Marge has to go out of town to see a sick aunt and makes Homer promise not to watch their show, "Odder Stuff" (yes, it's a "Stranger Things" parody). Homer agrees, despite the fact that it means he has to hide when the kids watch it. Homer is a weak man, though, and when he finds out everybody else has watched it, he can no longer hold out (he even has an "Odder Stuff" dream where he's in "The Simpsons" version of the Upside Down). Not only does he sneak an episode; he binges the whole season. A betrayal most foul, even if he learns to dance to win her back.

Always gets drunk

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Homer goes to Moe's after work, before work (Moe calls it Homer's "eye-opener"), and sometimes during work. He drinks every day. And almost every time he drinks, he continues until he's drunk. One example is when he gets too drunk on Christmas Eve ("I Won't Be Home for Christmas") to come home.

A lot of the mishaps described in this article are perfect examples of how his drinking has hurt Marge. When Barney tries to get sober, Homer resents it. One can only imagine how Marge must feel, taking care of the kids while Homer drinks himself into a stupor and staggers home. It becomes tough to figure out how many of Homer's worst acts are due to his drinking. He even once exclaims, "To alcohol: the cause of, and solution to, all of life's problems." Despite how much harm Homer has inflicted on his family, he's never once tried to really get sober (at least not without a court order).

Marge is constantly having to clean up Homer's alcohol-fueled messes. 

Had frequent near-dalliances

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Homer is fortunate to be married to Marge, a woman whom many other men pine after (from Artie Ziff to Moe), and who keeps the slob's happy domestic life together. Yet Homer is constantly tempted to stray, even when it's blatantly obvious that Marge is the better one in the relationship.

In the Season 3 episode "Colonel Homer," he leaves his family to manage Lurleen Lumpkin and they have a near-romance. In Season 5, he falls for his coworker Mindy in "The Last Temptation of Homer," only at the last moment resisting her. In "The Seven Beer Itch," Homer falls for a beautiful British woman. In the Season 27 premiere, Homer and Marge go to therapy (again), and he has a dream of a trial separation in which he ends up with a young woman.

Okay, that one technically ends up being Marge's dream. But her intuition, and Homer's penchant for having many near-trysts while Marge is home with the kids, obviously led her there. Plus, her dream came from Homer using his narcolepsy as an excuse for getting out of helping her out with anything around the house.

Ruined her life

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Marge manages the Simpson household. There's nothing wrong with this life, though Homer rarely seems to appreciate how much Marge does to keep the house running. When Lisa discovers in "Lisa Simpson, This Isn't Your Life" that Marge was extremely intelligent and motivated before she married Homer, she gets discouraged, since she feels this is her own destiny. She feels like Marge squandered all her potential for an idiot who disrespects her and hardly even fulfills his part of the old-school "man works, wife stays home" bargain.

"The Way We Was," the 12th episode of Season 2, also touches on this. That episode shows Marge as an extremely intelligent high school student with a passion for female empowerment and all of the academic promise in the world. She could have gone on to higher education and a great career, especially compared to Homer, who was unmotivated to do anything with his life. She falls for Homer in large part out of pity and supports him despite the fact that he has no desire to make life better for himself or his loved ones.

Arguably the worst thing Homer did was curb Marge's dreams and ambitions. It's mitigated only by the fact that this may have partly been her decision, though we never really see Marge getting a choice. 

Homer never really seems to acknowledge how much better her life would have been if Marge had found somebody as intelligent and motivated as she was. But hey, the brilliant homemaker and the lazy slob have had quite a zany ride. And their kids probably won't be too damaged by it.

Источник: https://www.looper.com/641099/the-worst-things-homer-ever-did-to-marge-on-the-simpsons/

The 10 Best Things Homer Simpson Has Ever Done As A Father

By Antonia Georgiou

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All too often, Homer Simpson gets a bad rep, but there are some truly tender moments in the long-running series.

In addition to frequently predicting the future, The Simpsons has provided fans with three decades' worth of comedic shenanigans. With a whole new generation introduced to the classic series via Disney+, the show has firmly cemented its reputation as one of the best comedies of all time.

All too often, Homer Simpson gets a bad rep; in recent years, the Simpson family patriarch has been associated with the coinage 'jerka** Homer'. But there are some truly tender moments in the long-running series. In particular, Homer's relationship with eldest daughter Lisa often provides us with wholesome storylines that really tug at the heartstrings.

Related: How 'The Simpsons' Honors Fallen Co-Stars

While most of the endearing moments in this list are from the classic Simpsons era, since modern episodes generally eschew sentiment in favor of cynicism, this rundown proves that there are, surprisingly, still some incredibly tender moments in modern Simpsons.

10 Homer Becomes The 'Pie Man'

In the season 15 episode 'Simple Simpson', Homer and Lisa head to the Springfield County Fair, where Lisa takes part in a place setting competition. She creates a stunning display complete with literary and music references, but this simply isn't to the taste of the brash Rich Texan, who is judging the competition. Cruelly, he admonishes all her efforts and humiliates the sobbing 8-year-old in front of the crowd of spectators. Enraged, Homer vows revenge: he dons a mask and cape and throws a piping-hot pie in the Rich Texan's face, who is ridiculed by the crowd, much to Lisa's delight.

9 Supporting Lisa's Crusade Against Jebediah Springfield

In an era in which once-loved celebrities, are routinely exposed for their dark pasts and cancelled, 'Lisa the Iconoclast' is a timely episode. In this season 7 classic, Lisa discovers that Springfield's founder, Jebediah Springfield, isn't the saintly hero that the town believes him to be; in fact, he was a vicious pirate who tried to kill George Washington. Outraged, Lisa is determined to expose the truth. The most endearing aspect of this episode is the fact that Homer is the only person who stands by Lisa and her convictions, even encouraging Springfield's citizens to exhume their hero in order to prove that his daughter is right.

8 Homer Risks His Life By Jumping The Springfield Gorge

Sometimes parents go to extremes in order to protect their kids, and that's just what Homer does in 'Bart the Daredevil'. This early classic from season 2 has been branded an 'era-defining' episode in the formation of the show's iconic status. Bart becomes obsessed with 'the world's greatest daredevil', Lance Murdock, after witnessing him perform a potentially lethal stunt involving leaping over a tank of water filled with sharks, eels, alligators, and a ravenous lion. Subsequently, Bart declares his plan to jump Springfield gorge. In a now legendary scene, Homer jumps the gorge instead, and in doing so teaches his son an important lesson.

7 Paying For Lisa's Sax

In this flashback episode from season 9, Homer and Marge tell the story of how Lisa first became interested in her beloved saxophone. As Marge recalls, it was a sweltering hot summer and the family was in dire need of an air-conditioner. Homer had been able to save up $200 dollars, but after seeing Lisa fall in love with a saxophone, he decides to use the money to buy her the instrument instead. This is a wonderful example of how selfless Homer can be, sacrificing his own comfort for his daughter's happiness.

6 Pretending To Be A Robot To Please Bart

Another later episode, 'I, (Annoyed Grunt)-Bot' from season 15 features Bart suffering from a terrible feeling of malaise after Homer's attempts to build him a bike fail. Seeing the palpable disappointment on his son's face, Homer tries to build Bart a robot in order to put a smile back on his face. This doesn't quite go according to plan, so Homer decides to actually be the robot by disguising himself within the device, without Bart's knowledge. Homer the robot wins many tournaments, enduring unbearable pain, all to please his son.

Related: 'The Simpsons': Compelling Proof That Moe Knows Bart Is The Mystery Prank Caller

5 Debunking The 'Simpson Gene' For Lisa

Lisa begins suffering from self-doubt in season 9's 'Lisa the Simpson', after she fails to complete a seemingly simple brain teaser. This is only worsened when Grandpa Abe tells her that she is losing her intellect due to the supposed 'Simpson gene'. Homer is determined to disprove this theory and restore his daughter's faith in her intellectual capabilities. Accordingly, he gathers all his relatives outside Lisa's room so that she can hear of their many achievements. While the Simpson men are generally dim-witted, Lisa is delighted to discover that all the Simpson women are highly intelligent, thereby restoring her self-esteem.

Related: Trolls Say 'Lisa Simpson Did It Best' As 'Simpsons' Makes Kamala Harris Prediction

4 A Sensory Deprivation Tank Reveals Homer's True Feelings

A pivotal but often forgotten episode in strengthening the Homer and Lisa relationship, season 10's 'Make Room for Lisa' again features Lisa suffering from despondency. After initially being reluctant to adhere to some of Dr. Hibbert's suggestions, Homer relents when he sees the hurt on his daughter's face. The two end up trying out a sensory-deprivation tank, during which Lisa imagines herself in her father's shoes: it's here that she realises just how much Homer truly loves her and all that he does for her.

3 Bobo Is Priceless

Season 5's 'Rosebud' is a timeless classic. An homage to Citizen Kane, the episode centers on Mr Burns' search for his beloved childhood teddy bear, Bobo. The bear ends up in the hands of Maggie, who immediately develops a strong attachment to it. Desperate to retrieve his bear, the selfish businessman offers Homer a million dollars and 3 Hawaiian Islands in exchange for the toy. But when Homer sees the devastation in his baby daughter's eyes, he realizes that no amount of money is worth more than his child's happiness.

2 Homer Buys Lisa A Pony

If we ever needed proof that Homer loves his kids then 'Lisa's Pony' is just that. In this season 3 tearjerker, Homer is determined to regain Lisa's love after her performance at the school talent show is ruined due to his failure to buy her a new reed in time for her recital. Realizing that Lisa's ultimate wish has always been to own a pony, Homer takes out a loan and buys her a beautiful pony whom she names Princess. But in order to feed Princess, and maintain her stable, Homer takes out a second job at the Kwik-E-Mart, suffering from severe exhaustion as a result. You'd be hard pressed not to burst into tears at Homer's selfless and unwavering love for his daughter in this heart-breaking classic.

1 'Do It For Her'

Although it has since spawned many memes, the 'do it for her' ending from season 6's And Maggie Makes Three is the ultimate manifestation of Homer's altruism as a father. Another flashback episode, Homer reminisces about leaving his job at the nuclear power plant, humiliating his boss Mr Burns in the process, and starting his dream job in a bowling alley. However, Marge falls pregnant with Maggie, forcing Homer to go back to the nuclear plant and grovel to Burns, who places a notice in Homer's work station that reads, 'Don't forget: you're here forever'. In the final scene, we discover why there are no baby pictures of Maggie in the Simpson home: all of Maggie's photos decorate Burns' notice on Homer's wall at work, spelling out 'Do it for her'.

Next: How Much Do The Voice Actors On 'The Simpsons' Make? 

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The reality star and her drummer beau Travis Barker recently jetted to Portofino, Italy, where they were seen enjoying each other's company.

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About The Author
Antonia Georgiou (211 Articles Published)

Antonia is a writer based in London, UK. She is a massive film and TV nerd who is always quick to offer random trivia about her favourite media. A graduate of Queen Mary University and UCL, her other passions include fashion, cats, books, and vegan food.

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Источник: https://www.thethings.com/the-best-things-homer-simpson-has-ever-done-as-a-father/

Until this week, I had never seen a single episode of The Simpsons. I can see your gaping maw, so let me explain: My parents weren’t fans of animated television, and by the time I reached adulthood, I had no desire to dredge up a box set or chase the episodes down online. The “golden age” of the show—season three to somewhere around season ten, or so I’ve been told—isn’t available on any of the streaming services I subscribe to. So I simply never watched. When I told my coworkers, they looked at me like I’d just spawned a third eyeball. One showed me a picture of the kid with blue hair and red glasses, asking, “Do you know who this is?”

“Of course,” I responded, pulling up the meme of him throwing a frisbee to no one, running after it, and throwing it back.

“Do you know his name?” my coworker followed up. Nope.

I have always been familiar with the cultural cachet of the show—the celebrity cameos, the impact on popular culture, and yes, the memes. But I didn’t know the names of characters or even the vastness of the show’s run. I simply assumed The Simpsons peaked in the 2000s, then vanished. I had no idea it was still on air.

But when I decided—really, was forced by my editors—to check the show out, I was intimidated by the nearly 639 episodes, so I searched for someone who could be my guide. I found Tyler Shores, a PhD candidate at Cambridge who taught a class at UC Berkeley called “The Simpsons and Philosophy” in 2003. “You see classes that reference pop culture more frequently now, but at the time, there weren’t really courses that used non-academic or classic texts,” Shores told me over Skype. “I designed this course for a semester, and I really didn’t expect so many students to show up. But I had 500 the first year.” The class became so well known it was even recognized by Simpsons writers and featured in the episode “Little Girl in the Big Ten.”

Shores selected 11 episodes for me to watch, based off of my self-professed interests, with the intent of providing a healthy range. I trusted him; his knowledge of the show seemed impressively encyclopedic. And I have to say, every single episode I watched, nearly all from the golden age, gave me something different—a different core cast member feature, a different narrative formula, a different target of satire, a celebrity cameo. He also included one of his favorites and one of Matt Groening's favorites. Here is the full list:

  • "Lisa the Vegetarian"; season 7, episode 5
  • "Homer the Heretic"; season 4, episode 3
  • "Last Exit to Springfield"; season 4, episode 17
  • "Homer’s Enemy"; season 8, episode 23
  • "Marge vs. The Monorail"; season 4, episode 12
  • "And Maggie Makes Three"; season 6, episode 13
  • "Homer the Great"; season 6, episode 12
  • "One Fish Two Fish Blowfish Blue Fish"; season 2, episode 11
  • "Homer Badman"; season 6, episode 9
  • "Treehouse of Horror I"; season 2, episode 3
  • "Who Shot Mr. Burns"; season 6, episode 25 and season 7, episode 1


Bad news first: On balance, I did not enjoy this show. This isn’t particularly surprising—I have never enjoyed sitcoms, and have always found it difficult to sink my teeth into a show that isn’t serialized or at least features long narrative arcs. A lot of people enjoy shows without continuity because anyone can watch any episode, no background knowledge required. But that quality has always made a show less enjoyable for me—the only sitcom I truly love, The Good Place, is extremely serialized.

But my dislike of it extends beyond the sitcom format. You might as well call me Frank Grimes, because I absolutely hate Homer, and couldn’t stand watching the show mostly due to his character. I don’t find him funny or likable—he’s an insufferable, pathetic freeloader. I don’t understand how people can bear him. You’re either laughing at his expense, which simply makes me sad, or you’re supposed to laugh at the scenarios he manages to get into and out of due to his inanity. And most of his triumphs seem to be at the expense of people who are actually conscientious and hard working.

It follows that “Homer’s Enemy,” a sort of meta-episode where Homer’s charmed life is challenged by the hardworking Frank Grimes, was my favorite episode of the bunch. Shores told me it was also one of Matt Groening’s favorites. I respect the show immensely for its willingness to play devil’s advocate toward one of its main characters, and the episode displayed a level of awareness that the show has become famous for. But I found myself wishing that it was Homer who died at the end of the episode, rather than Grimey.

Still from Fox Broadcasting.

The other crux of my discontent with The Simpsons comes from the way Marge is continually treated like a doormat. Obviously, The Simpsons started in 1989, before “political correctness”—otherwise known as being tolerant and conscientious towards people—was a concern for a lot of folks. I didn’t go in expecting it to be free of prejudice, but the fact that people still love the show and considered it progressive for its time gave me a kernel of hope. Not so, at least not when it came to the abuse heaped on Marge. I don’t understand why she doesn’t just divorce Homer’s dumb ass. I didn’t even have to take notes as I watched in order to remember these moments:

  • In “Marge vs. The Monorail,” she pitches the idea of using Springfield’s budgetary surplus for repairing the roads, which is only accepted after Homer’s father makes a case, ironically against road repairs (I assume this is supposed to be funny). Marge gets ignored (is this supposed to be satire?). She then investigates the monorail to learn it’s a fraud. Despite her having done all of the work, it’s Homer who saves the day despite being an idiot (I assume this is also supposed to be funny). Yay, men take the credit once again.
  • In “Homer’s Enemy,” Marge cooks a nice lobster dinner so Homer can reconcile with Frank Grimes. Homer hasn’t even told Marge that Grimes doesn’t know about this dinner (which, I guess, is also supposed to be funny). At this point, this show feels like an infinite setup for Marge to put in so much bloody work only to have her oafish husband fuck it all up. I hate him. I hate him so much.
  • “And Maggie Makes Three” perhaps made me the angriest of the episodes—an astounding assertion, given my blood pressure during the above moments. Three separate people recommended this episode to me as “heartfelt.” It’s the episode where Homer is able to quit his hated nuclear plant gig in order to work his dream job at the bowling alley. That premise, at least, is funny. When Marge becomes pregnant, she hides it from her husband because she knows his dream job can’t financially support another child. Through flashbacks, we learn that every time Marge is pregnant, Homer apparently gets so angry he rips his hair out (which is somehow supposed to be funny). Homer is horrible at reading his wife’s emotions or caring for her in any way, including her morning sickness (which is also somehow supposed to be funny). He then bitches and moans—even though SHE’S THE ONE literally giving birth—until he physically holds baby Maggie. He instantly loves Maggie and returns to the power plant to financially support her. Mr. Burns erects the sign “Don't forget: you're here forever,” which Homer covers in Maggie’s baby photos so that the sign reads “do it for her.” Cue the “awwws.” Because Homer had feelings about his own child for approximately three seconds on screen, it’s a touching episode. Give Homer a fucking trophy.
  • In “Homer Badman,” when Homer goes to a candy convention, Marge is his candy mule. Fun.

“Homer Badman” also made me angry more generally, in the way only a episode of a 90s show could. In this one, Homer is indicted by the media for “sexually harassing” a female grad student. Except he was only really grabbing a gummy Venus de Milo off of her butt, not grabbing her ass. He gets featured on a tabloid-style show that edits his interview to make him “admit” to being a harasser. While this episode does a great job demonstrating the way media can snowball out of control, the episode’s entire premise is a load of hogwash. No one, literally not a single person on. the. planet. Would protest about a female grad student getting ass-grabbed.

Photo from Fox Broadcasting.

The hyperbole of this isn’t funny to me, nor does it read as satire. That isn’t a “in this #metoo moment the show doesn’t hold up” observation. It's just how the world operates. Yesterday I got street harassed five times on the way to work, and twice on the way back. I’ve been inappropriately groped by too many strangers to keep count. If anyone cared enough to do a damn thing about it, maybe I could watch this episode and laugh. This episode feels like the least realistic of all of them, including the Halloween special “Treehouse of Horror" episodes.

None of this even begins to touch on my disappointment at the way Lisa is continually used as a punching bag. I can’t go there right now. She was my favorite.

That being said, I don’t want to dismiss the importance of The Simpsons—I appreciate the immense impact this show has had on pop culture, animated and family sitcoms, and even politics. This type of humor largely didn’t exist before, and it has created its own vocabulary. And there are aspects of the show I genuinely love:

  • The irreverent meta-humor. My absolute favorite line of any episode I watched came from “Lisa the Vegetarian.” After watching an episode of Itchy and Scratchy, Lisa laments about the way cartoons peddle specific ideologies. “Cartoons don’t have messages Lisa,” Bart responds, adding that they’re supposed to be mindlessly violent. At that exact moment Homer violently opens the door into him. I love that willingness to break the fourth wall in a way that makes us reflect on our own entertainment consumption habits.
  • Incredible wordplay, like “Stern Plumbing” being the name of a company but also featuring a logo of a plumber saying something stern. In that same episode, “Homer the Great”—the Freemason-based satire about the Stonecutters—Marge says, “Kids can be so cruel” to comfort Homer, which Bart takes to mean, “Kids are permitted by their mother to be so cruel” and starts tormenting Lisa. There’s the delightful line “a toast to the host who can boast the most roast” in “Lisa the Vegetarian.” Other random moments: Bart pronouncing “macabre” as “mah-cah-bray,” and the line “it was the best of times, it was the blurst of times."
  • I really loved the satire of the Freemasons. Obviously political and historical satire are baked into the legacy of The Simpsons, especially with the vulture-like Mr. Burns and the nuclear power plant.
  • The celebrity cameos are magnificent, and give the show a sense of really connecting to the real world. The Simpsons is also obviously historic for these, and I loved seeing Paul and Linda McCartney on the roof of Apu’s shop and Leonard Nimoy at the monorail unveiling. Even from my limited perspective, I can see the echoes of this influence on modern sitcoms, like Prince playing himself in New Girl or Oprah on 30 Rock. Likewise, I appreciated the show’s encyclopedic range of references, from Charles Dickens to Tom and Jerry.
  • Weirdly, hair might be my absolute favorite thing about this show. It’s reductive but also a synecdoche for the show’s insane attention to detail. I love that no one else in the town has hair as ridiculous as Marge—that it bends when she sits in the car or puts it in a nightcap. I love that a part of it gets snipped off in “Last Exit to Springfield,” when Mr. Burns arrives at their home by helicopter. I love that Bart’s head crown sometimes functions as his head, but sometimes functions as hair—like when it’s combed down for church or a nice dinner.

Unfortunately, my distaste for Homer and the way Marge and Lisa are continually abused really soured my enjoyment of these incredible TV gags. The upending of my enjoyment vis a vis the main narrative of the show made it even more frustrating and irritating.

It is also worth noting that the treatment of Apu, and Asian characters more broadly, contributed to my distaste. Just one example: When Homer questions his religion in “Homer the Heretic,” he says it’s OK to be “Christian, or Jewish or,” as he points at Apu’s Ganesh shrine, “whatever that is.” That sort of othering feels very personal. Asians also get weirdly-drawn faces in the show, though other characters simply get to have the same face styles in different skin tones. I don’t really know how to think about it beyond recognizing that the white folks in Springfield are already yellow, so the show had to sub in some other racial "features" to indicate Asian characters. A lot has been said about race in The Simpsons and 90s shows more broadly—I don’t need or want to dive into that here more than I already have.

The fundamental problem for me is I simply can’t relate to The Simpsons. It’s about a white family in a small, mostly white town. It imagines a vision of America that has never been mine and could never be mine. And, of course, I can't stomach Homer or the way he's supposed to be the hero in so many episodes.

If you love The Simpsons and the show is special to you, that's great. If you used it as an accessible framework for philosophical matters—as Shores and his students have—even better.

Just don't tell me to watch another episode.

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Источник: https://www.vice.com/en/article/j5kwj7/i-watched-the-simpsons-for-the-first-time-ever-and-i-couldnt-stand-it

The 10 Best Things Homer Simpson Has Ever Done As A Father

By Antonia Georgiou

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All too often, Homer Simpson gets a bad rep, but there are some truly homer simpson do it for her moments in the long-running series.

In addition to frequently predicting the future, The Simpsons has provided fans with three decades' worth of comedic shenanigans. With a whole new generation introduced to the classic series via Disney+, the show has firmly cemented its reputation as one of the best comedies of all time.

All too often, Homer Simpson gets a bad rep; in recent years, the Simpson family patriarch has been associated with the coinage 'jerka** Homer'. But there are homer simpson do it for her truly tender moments in the long-running series. In particular, Homer's relationship with eldest daughter Lisa often provides us with wholesome storylines that really tug at the heartstrings.

Related: How 'The Simpsons' Honors Fallen Co-Stars

While most of the endearing moments in this list are from the classic Simpsons era, since modern episodes generally eschew sentiment in favor of cynicism, this rundown proves that there are, surprisingly, still some incredibly tender moments in modern Simpsons.

10 Homer Becomes The 'Pie Man'

In the season 15 episode 'Simple Simpson', Homer and Lisa head to the Springfield County Fair, where Lisa takes part in a place setting competition. She creates a stunning display complete with literary and music references, but this simply isn't to the taste of the brash Rich Texan, who is judging the competition. Cruelly, he admonishes all her efforts and humiliates the sobbing 8-year-old in front of the crowd of spectators. Enraged, Homer vows revenge: he dons a mask and cape and throws a piping-hot pie in the Rich Texan's face, who is ridiculed by the crowd, much to Lisa's delight.

9 Supporting Lisa's Crusade Against Jebediah Springfield

In an era in which once-loved celebrities, are routinely exposed for their dark pasts and cancelled, 'Lisa the Iconoclast' is a timely episode. In this season 7 classic, Lisa discovers that Springfield's founder, Jebediah Springfield, isn't the saintly hero that the town believes him to be; in fact, he was a vicious pirate who tried to kill George Washington. Outraged, Lisa is determined to expose the truth. The most endearing aspect of this episode is the fact that Homer is the only person who stands by Lisa and her convictions, even encouraging Springfield's citizens to exhume their hero in order to prove that his daughter is right.

8 Homer Risks His Life By Jumping The Springfield Gorge

Sometimes parents go to extremes in order to protect their kids, and that's just what Homer does in 'Bart the Daredevil'. This early classic from season 2 has been branded an 'era-defining' episode in the formation of the show's iconic status. Bart becomes obsessed with 'the world's greatest daredevil', Lance Murdock, after witnessing him perform a potentially lethal stunt involving leaping over a tank of water filled with sharks, eels, alligators, and a ravenous lion. Subsequently, Bart declares his plan to jump Springfield gorge. In a now legendary scene, Homer jumps the gorge instead, and in doing so teaches his son an important lesson.

7 Paying For Lisa's Sax

In this flashback episode from season 9, Homer and Marge tell the story of how Lisa first became interested in her beloved saxophone. As Marge recalls, it was a sweltering hot summer and the family was in dire need of an air-conditioner. Homer had been able to save up $200 dollars, but after seeing Lisa fall in love with a saxophone, he decides to use the money to buy her the instrument instead. This is a wonderful example of how selfless Homer can be, sacrificing his own comfort for his daughter's happiness.

6 Pretending To Be A Robot To Please Bart

Another later episode, 'I, (Annoyed Grunt)-Bot' from season 15 features Bart suffering from a terrible feeling of malaise after Homer's attempts to build him a bike fail. Seeing the palpable disappointment on his son's face, Homer tries to build Bart a robot in order to put a smile back on his face. This doesn't quite go according to plan, so Homer decides to actually be the robot by disguising himself within the device, without Bart's knowledge. Homer the robot wins many tournaments, enduring unbearable pain, all to please his son.

Related: 'The Simpsons': Compelling Proof That Moe Knows Bart Is The Mystery Prank Caller

5 Debunking The 'Simpson Gene' For Lisa

Lisa begins suffering from self-doubt in season 9's 'Lisa the Simpson', after she fails to complete a seemingly simple brain teaser. This is only worsened when Grandpa Abe tells her that she is losing her intellect due to the supposed 'Simpson gene'. Homer is determined to disprove this theory and restore his daughter's faith in her intellectual capabilities. Accordingly, he gathers all his relatives outside Lisa's room so that she can hear of their many achievements. While the Simpson men are generally dim-witted, Lisa is delighted to discover that all the Simpson women are highly intelligent, thereby restoring her self-esteem.

Related: Trolls Say 'Lisa Simpson Did It Best' As 'Simpsons' Makes Kamala Harris Prediction

4 A Sensory Deprivation Tank Reveals Homer's True Feelings

A pivotal but often forgotten episode in strengthening the Homer and Lisa relationship, season 10's 'Make Room for Lisa' again features Lisa suffering from despondency. After initially being reluctant to adhere to some of Dr. Hibbert's suggestions, Homer relents when he sees the hurt on his daughter's face. The two end up trying out a sensory-deprivation tank, during which Lisa imagines herself in her father's shoes: it's here that she realises just how much Homer truly loves her and all that he does for her.

3 Bobo Is Priceless

Season 5's 'Rosebud' is a timeless classic. An homage to Citizen Kane, the episode centers on Mr Burns' search for his beloved childhood teddy bear, Bobo. The bear ends up in the hands of Maggie, who immediately develops a strong attachment to it. Desperate to retrieve his bear, the selfish businessman offers Homer a million dollars and 3 Hawaiian Islands in exchange for the toy. But when Homer sees the devastation in his baby daughter's eyes, he realizes that no amount of money is worth more than his child's happiness.

2 Homer Buys Lisa A Pony

If we ever needed proof that Homer loves his kids then 'Lisa's Pony' is just that. In this season 3 tearjerker, Homer is determined to regain Lisa's love after her performance at the school talent show is ruined due to his failure to buy her a new reed in time for her recital. Realizing that Lisa's ultimate wish has always been to own a pony, Homer takes out a loan and buys her a beautiful pony whom she names Princess. But in order to feed Princess, and maintain her stable, Homer takes out a second job at the Kwik-E-Mart, suffering from severe exhaustion as a result. You'd be hard pressed not to burst into tears at Homer's selfless and unwavering love for his daughter in this heart-breaking classic.

1 'Do It For Her'

Although it has since spawned many memes, the 'do it for her' ending from season 6's And Maggie Makes Three is the ultimate manifestation of Homer's altruism as a father. Another flashback episode, Homer reminisces about leaving his job at the nuclear power plant, humiliating his boss Mr Burns in the process, and starting his dream job in a bowling alley. However, Marge falls pregnant with Maggie, forcing Homer to go back to the nuclear plant and grovel to Burns, who places a notice in Homer's work station that reads, 'Don't forget: you're here forever'. In the final scene, we discover why there are no baby pictures of Maggie in the Simpson home: all of Maggie's photos decorate Burns' notice on Homer's wall at work, spelling out 'Do it for her'.

Next: How Much Do The Voice Actors On 'The Simpsons' Make? 

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About The Author
Antonia Georgiou (211 Articles Published)

Antonia is a writer based in London, UK. She is a massive film and TV nerd who is always quick to offer random trivia about her favourite media. A graduate of Queen Mary University and UCL, her other passions include fashion, cats, books, and vegan food.

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Источник: https://www.thethings.com/the-best-things-homer-simpson-has-ever-done-as-a-father/

The Simpsonshas been around longer than the internet, so it’s no surprise that the show has several memes devoted to it. The most famous is probably Homer backing into the bushes, which was so prolific it even ended up on an episode of The Simpsons. Another popular Simpsons meme is “Do it for her,” and there is a heartwarming story behind it. 

The Simpsons family all smiling except Bart

‘The Simpsons’ ‘Do it for her’ meme

According to Know Your Meme, the Simpsons “Do it for her” meme could be traced as far back as 2001, six years after the episode aired. Back then, Simpsons fans on message boards would share their feelings about “Do it for her,” and the episode made lists on IGN, VH1, Splitsider and No Homer’s Club.

The Simpsons baby Maggie plays <i>homer simpson do it for her</i> blocks

RELATED: ‘The Simpsons’ On Disney+: The Best HD Episodes to Watch Right Now

The base image shows Homer Simpson’s wall above his control panel at the Springfield nuclear power plant. There are spaces for blank photos, which in the original image contain Maggie Simpson. The pictures would cover a bulletin board so that the visible letters spell “Do it for her.” 

Know Your Meme says a March 20, 2006 deviantART user named ajfaggiani swapped the animated image of Maggie Simpson for his own daughter, and a friend named Javier. From 2011 to 2012, further parodies of “Do It For Her” appeared on Facebook and 4chan. There are now templates on sites like Meme.Market and Imgflip to help you make your own Simpsons do it for her meme, such as this Twitter user’s Playstation 5 homage: 

And this one about Tails from Sonic the Hedgehog, which added some new letters to make it read, “Do it for him’:

When did “And Maggie Makes Three” air?

“And Maggie Makes Three” was the 13th episode of The Simpsons’ sixth season, originally aired Jan. 25. It is a flashback episode in which Homer tells the story of when Maggie was born. At the time, the flashback went two years earlier to 1993. The season 32 episode “Do PizzaBots Dream of Electric Guitars,” aired March 14, 2021, had a flashback to the ’90s and Homer was a teenager, since that would be over 20 years ago from now. Maggie remains a baby here in 2021. 

The Simpsons -Homer and Grandpa Simpson stuck in the '90s

RELATED: ‘The Simpsons’ Breaks More Records with Season 33 and 34 Renewal

Homer’s story tells of how he quit the nuclear power plant and took a dream job at a bowling alley. When Marge gets pregnant a third time, his bowling alley job won’t cover a family of five. So, grudgingly, Homer has to beg Mr. Burns for his power plant job back, as viewers in 1995 could assume since he still worked there in the present day. 

Why does Homer Simpson do it for her?

Mr. Burns isn’t exactly magnanimous about taking Homer back. He puts up a big sign above the control panel reading “Don’t forget, you’re here forever.” 

RELATED: What It Means To Be A ‘Simpsons’ Fan For 30 Years

Homer uses photographs of baby Maggie to cover up the words so that it reads “Do it for her.” That, and the pictures of Maggie, remind Homer why he gave up his dream job.

Source: Know Your Meme

Источник: https://www.cheatsheet.com
excel apply accounting number format secrets behind the award-winning dubbing of ‘The Simpsons’
Dub steps: Homer, Marge, Bart and Lisa.

For dubbing to be good you mustn’t notice it: that’s the motto of Ana María Simón Rius, the 71-year-old actress responsible for adapting and directing the Spanish dubbing of such landmark American series as The Sopranos and The Simpsons. Her daily work on the latter has just earned her, for the second year running, the award for best film and TV translation and adaptation work in Spain from Atrae (the Spain Association of Translation and Adaptation). Once again, she is sharing the prize with her right-hand woman, translator María José Aguirre de Cárcer, who also shares her same professional philosophy: the work has to pass unnoticed to make the product shine.

The steps that have to be followed before an episode of The Simpsons reaches Spanish TV screens are precisely measured. “As soon as you walk in they ask for the work to be done yesterday,” says Simón, who has spent the last 30 years working against the clock. She inherited the job of adapting and directing the dubbing of The Simpsons from actor Carlos Revillas after he died in 2000. “It was very tough. What’s more Carlos also dubbed Homer. And there were a lot of complaints from fans over the change of voice. But what were we going to do? Right away I sat down with a half-finished script. I did voice auditions and I replaced him with Carlos Ysbert. We were working with tears in our eyes. But Carlos [Ysbert] took over the character and did a marvelous job.”

‘The Simpsons’ initially flopped in Germany: “They translated it literally, and people didn’t find it funny”

For the script to get to the dubbing actors in perfect condition it first has to pass through the hands of translator Aguirre. The 60-year-old says she loves languages so much that her husband often calls her a “nerd:” “Because I even love watching films in Danish,” she laughs. It was her ingenuity that came up with the Spanish translation of Bart’s famous catchphrase “Eat my shorts” – “multiplícate por cero” (literally, “multiply yourself by zero” – or “get lost”). The work of a translator does not consist of changing one word for another: “I endeavor to give the original work the utmost respect, but the jokes also need to be understood here, too. If not, the work has failed,” she explains. “Eat my shorts” doesn’t make much sense translated literally into Spanish, but if you simply translate it as “get homer simpson do it for her it loses its spark. “So you have to invent another play on words to substitute the original,” says Aguirre, who has been battling with the series’ scripts since it was first broadcast in Spain in 1990, combining it with those of other hit shows such as The X-Files, Lost and Seinfeld.

Aguirre says that The Simpsons was initially a flop in Germany: “They translated the script literally, and people didn’t find it funny. In fact, Fox [the show’s producer] congratulated the Spanish studios because it was the best translation of The Simpsons that had been done. And in Germany it was the worst,” she explains proudly. “Translators need to do their research. A line said by someone highbrow is not the same as one said by someone from the Bronx. And what’s more, it is essential that you don’t always trust what it says in the dictionary. I am always asking a doctor friend of mine about things, and he has often said to me: ‘It’s great that you consult me because I am fed up with seeing films about doctors where everything they say is absurd.”

Homer Simpson.

When Aguirre’s translation is finished the script continues to the next phase: the adaptation. Here Simón takes charge of seeing which lines fit into the mouths of the characters: “There are times when you need a whole sentence to say in Spanish what you can in two words in English. And you have to adjust it. Or when an actor says ‘I put myself in your shoes’ and the Spanish translation is ‘me pongo en tu piel’ [I put myself in your skin]. But how are you going to say that if the actor is pointing at their feet, for example? You have to turn them around so that they don’t lose meaning and turn out funny. […] It’s not always easy, but it is a very nice, artistic job.”

After that it is time to record the dubbing, which is “always done by actors, who are the best dubbers. The voice of Bart, for example, belongs to Sara Viva. It seems as if she is made for the character, or the character is made for her. It is amazing,” explains the director, who in daily life admits that she alternates between watching dubbed and original version films. “They are not incompatible. I am in favor of people being able to choose. The important thing is that the work is well done.”

And that, in her world, means it goes on staying hidden.

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Maggie, daughter of Homer and Marge Simpson, sister to Lisa and Bart, the baby of the family who rarely speaks, has a violent temper and even an arch-enemy at the age of 1.

If you love the youngest member of the Simpson’s family, you’ll love these top ten fun facts about Maggie Simpson!

Maggie is the least seen and heard in the Simpson Family.

Maggie Simpson's Birth

Since she cannot speak, it is harder for the writers to produce a storyline for Maggie which would keep the watchers attention.

She is often not seen alone for a majority of an episode.

Maggie’s full name is Margaret Simpson.

Maggie's full name is Margaret Simpson

This was first revealed in the episode ‘Home Sweet Homediddly-Dum-Doodily’, which was season 7, episode 3.

Maggie doesn’t like spending time with her aunts Patty and Selma.

Maggie doesn't like spending time with her aunts Patty and Selma

This seems to run in the family, as Homer, Bart and Lisa also dislike their company.

In 2009, the new HD opening title sequence was introduced, where Maggie now scans in at $486.52.

In the opening sequence, Maggie is scanned at a supermarket checkout scanner, and cost $847.63

Before the 2009 update, in opening sequence, Maggie was scanned at a supermarket checkout scanner, and cost $847.63.

This is a reference to the monthly cost of caring of babies in 1989.

Maggie is amazing at playing the saxophone.

Maggie is amazing at playing the saxophone

It’s not just Lisa who can play the saxophone, however Lisa could also play as a baby.

Maggie can change her own diapers.

Maggie can change her own diapers

Just like Lisa could when she was a baby.

Maggie as a teenager, wears a necklace with her dummy attached.

Maggie as a teenager, wears a necklace with her dummy attached

This was seen in the episode ‘Lisa’s wedding’, where it is set 15 years in the future.

Maggie apparently never shuts up however throughout the episode, she is interrupted every time she tries to speak.

Maggie’s first word was “Daddy.”

Maggie's first word was "Daddy"

This is something neither Bart or Lisa would call him when they were babies.

She has also said “Daddily Doodily” when she was in the care of Ned Flanders.

Maggie is a violent child.

Maggie is a violent child

She has hit Homer over the head with a mallet, and let’s not forget that she shot Mr Burns!

She has also shot people from the mafia, smashed her baby bottle to use for a weapon and dropped a rock on Russ Cargill’s head in The Simpsons Movie.

Maggie’s arch-enemy Baby Gerald, was born on the same day as her.

Maggie's arch-enemy Baby Gerald

The Springfield General Hospital had one diaper left when they were born, and it was given to Maggie.

Baby Gerald was wrapped in the discount section of the Springfield Shopper and he developed a rash which continues to irritate him to this day.

He blames Maggie for this and spends his nap times plotting revenge.

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Источник: https://www.thefactsite.com/maggie-simpson-facts/

Two weeks ago, we argued that the latest season of The Simpsons has seen Lisa Simpson exiled to storyline purgatory, doomed to repeat the same mistakes over and over. In this week’s episode, we have the middle Simpson child ambling down a well-worn path yet again – but finding that those around her don’t react like they did last time.

Lisa thinks her B- in a school project (a B- for a ‘what inspires me’ report) will www 53 com car payments her dream of getting to Yale. But her Yale dreams have changed – where second chance checking account near me she dreamed of finding an academic utopia, she now imagines being surrounded by moronic, unicycle-riding, over-privileged guys in boater hats.

In the past, Homer would scoff at Lisa’s championing of unsung women of colour. Yet this week, when she makes a mobile inspired by Gladys West, a woman whose work on satellites helped develop GPS, the joke is that Homer knows exactly who she is and resents her for inventing a system that means he can no longer pretend to get lost.

The Simpsons

Lisa’s typical response to imperfect grades would be to suck up (season 14’s ‘Bart vs. Lisa vs. the Third Grade’), to cheat (season 10’s ‘Lisa Gets an “A”’) or to play saxophone (season 29’s ‘Lisa Gets the Blues’). Here, she calls Miss Hoover a “hack” and refuses to apologise, arguing women are made to feel “we have to apologise for existing”. When she briefly considers turning to the blues, the ghost of Bleeding Gums Murphy pops up and tells her “don’t you drag us into your problems”. Ouch.

At the end of it all, Lisa can’t figure out what the moral of the story was either. The timing of the episode is better here in the UK than its original US broadcast, falling in the week of International Women’s Day and Meghan Markle’s Oprah interview – both of which have sparked intelligent debate about privilege, sexism and race. In contrast, this episode is muddled. We have an 8-year-old girl who used to be considered Greta Thunberg-level righteous who now can’t get it right. Might it be possible that The Simpsons’ writers are projecting?

Ms Hoover

Plot synopsis

Lisa’s insolence to her teacher, Miss Hoover, lands her in detention, where Bart helps her toughen up. When her refusal to apologise to Miss Hoover doesn’t restore the status quo, Lisa follows Hoover home in order to better understand her foe – but is instead saddened to find her teacher living in miserable conditions. Can she make it better? She’ll certainly try.

What was good

Bart’s ingenious way of swerving apologies by saying “I’m soggy” instead of “I’m sorry”. Bet you try it out IRL.

What wasn’t

The clumsiness – but we’ve said enough about that.

Lisa

Gag of the week

Bart, to Lisa, in detention. “There is a detention for teachers. It’s called being a teacher.”

Easter Egg of the week

Yes, that’s an El Barto tag in Miss Hoover’s neighbourhood – good to see Bart’s graffiti-spraying alter-ego lives on. And later, ears peeled for the Yale jerks singing to the tune of ‘Baby On Board’ from season five’s ‘Homer’s Barbershop Quartet’.

Sight gag of the week

Miss Hoover reading What Time Is Lunch? magazine. Where do we subscribe?

Homer Simpson

Did you spot these pop culture references?

One kid’s class presentation is a Jack O’Lantern head inspired by The Masked Singer. Later, when Lisa says her presentation will be in the form of a rap, a classmate in a Drake T-shirt bolts through the window.

Weird moment of the week

Maggie Simpson quietly building a model of a Diethyl 4-Methylbenzylphosphonate molecule, a compound that a small amount of research tells me is used for “Horner-Emmons reactions”. Odd.

Eye on Springfield

  • Writer: Nell Scovell
  • Guest stars: None
  • Couch gag: The Simpsons do Pacman, in glorious 8-bit.
  • Blackboard message: “I will not put laxatives in Santa’s cookies”.
  • Is it as good as the old ones? No. But there are some great character gags along the way.
  • Like this episode? Try this one: ‘Lisa on Ice’, from season six. It’s another ‘Lisa can’t handle failure’ episode – on ice!

‘The Simpsons’ season 32 episode 9 airs on Sky One at 8pm tonight (March 12)

Источник: https://www.nme.com/reviews/tv-recaps/the-simpsons-season-32-episode-9-sorry-not-sorry-2899441

Recap / homer simpson do it for her The Simpsons S 6 E 13 And Maggie Makes Three

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/rsz_1279110.png

"So you loved her right from the start?" "Absolutely."

Episode - 2F10
First Aired - 1/22/1995

During one of Marge's self-imposed, weekly family hours, the Simpsons are looking through the photo album. The kids notice that the album doesn't contain any pictures of Maggie, which prompts a Whole Episode Flashback about the events leading up to the youngest Simpson's birth.

Some time in the last two years, Homer has finally saved up enough money working at the Springfield Nuclear Power Plant to quit; he does so grandly, mocking Mr. Burns and even burning up a wooden bridge as he drives from the building. He then gets his "dream job" at Barney's uncle's bowling alley, explaining to Marge that he's worked out a budget that will allow the family to get by so long as nothing unexpected happens. To celebrate, Homer and Marge have a romantic evening together.

In a few weeks, Marge is suffering from homer simpson do it for her sickness, and a visit to Dr. Hibbert reveals that she is pregnant. While she quickly tells her children, she's much more reluctant to share the news with Homer, especially after he thanks God for his life being perfect just as it is. Instead, Marge turns to her sisters, who are delighted to hear the news—and even more delighted to learn that Homer would be devastated if he found out about the pregnancy. Marge makes Patty and Selma promise not to tell Homer; instead, they call up the biggest gossips in Springfield, who are quick to spread the word. The Bouviers then arrange a baby shower for Marge right before Homer gets home from work. He finally pieces together what's happening, and throws a screaming fit.

Later that evening, Marge and Homer discuss the future: Homer knows that he can't possibly support a third child on his bowling alley paycheck. Marge suggests that he ask for a raise, and while his boss is willing to give it, the alley isn't making enough money to provide for one. Homer then tries to drum up business by wildly firing a gun outside the building and shouting at passerby. This plan fails, and also costs him his dream job. A reluctant Homer knows that there is only one place where he can find work, and goes back to the power plant. Mr. Burns decides to humiliate Homer even further by installing a bleak plaque above his old workstation: "DON'T FORGET: YOU'RE HERE FOREVER." Devastated, Homer returns home and complains to Marge, who tells him that she's begun having contractions.

At the hospital, Dr. Hibbert works to deliver the baby as Homer, still depressed, comments on the miracle of "another mouth." Even the child's birth can't rouse his spirits.until a tiny hand reaches out and grabs his thumb. He looks down at Maggie and immediately loves her, taking her into his arms and declaring her "the most beautiful baby girl in the whole world." While he and Marge kiss, Maggie, feeling neglected while mimicking them kissing, reaches off-screen and discovers a familiar pacifier.

Back in the present, Lisa is thrilled to hear that the story has a happy ending, but Bart is confused: Homer still hasn't told them why there aren't any pictures of Maggie in the family album. Homer explains that there are plenty of pictures, and that he keeps them "where he needs the most cheering up." The episode cuts to a shot of Homer's workstation, where the walls are plastered with dozens of photos of Maggie—along with the plaque, where they have been arranged to cover the letters to form a new message: "DO IT FOR HER."


This episode contain examples of:

  • And This Is for.: Played for Laughs when Homer quits his job at the power plant, he proceeds to literally do whatever he wants to Mr. Burns. Upon leaving, he remarks: "That's for employing me for eight years!"
  • Babies Make Everything Better: Marge's third pregnancy ruined Homer's plans for a dream job and future happiness, forcing him to take up work at the power plant again, and he made it no secret that he was miserable about the whole thing. What brought him out of his depression? Maggie's birth. The episode kicks off with Bart and Lisa noticing that Maggie has no baby pictures. At the end, Homer explains that they are where he needs them the most. Cut to his station at the power plant, decorated with pictures of Maggie. Mr. Burns put up a plaque reading "Don't Forget - You're Here Forever" when Homer was re-hired. The photos block out bits and pieces of this sign so it reads, "Do It For Her." This trope was also averted when we see how Homer lost his hair: whenever Marge announced that she was pregnant, Homer would rip out a handful of hair from his scalp and run upstairs screaming.
  • Bait-and-Switch: At least five examples:
    • After Homer quits his job and starts looking forward to his "dream job in paradise", we cut to Homer in what appears to be a tropical setting, complete with steel drum music. Then, he declares, "And now, the final phase of my plan," and it is revealed that he's actually at the bowling alley.
    • To celebrate Homer's new job, he and Marge go out for a romantic evening, with their first activity being dinner and dancing. We see a shot of a high-end restaurant and dance club district, implying that this is where they will spend their evening. Then the camera pans across town to a nearby Krusty Burger, where Homer and Marge are sitting in the drive-thru dancing to the radio.
    • When Patty and Selma decide to call people to tell them about Marge's pregnancy, they open a phone book and start making calls to someone named "A. Aaronson"; the scene fades to the phone book now on its last page, and the sisters saying goodbye to "Mr. Zowkowski," which implies that they've called everyone from A to Z. Patty then remarks that "Aaronson and Zowkowski are the biggest gossips in town," meaning homer simpson do it for her they only contacted two people.
    • When Homer decides to get a raise at the bowling alley:

      Homer: That's it, I'm going to march right up to Al and say —
      (Cut to Homer at the alley)
      Homer: Steve! I mean, Al!

    • When Homer tries to come up with an idea to attract more customers to Bowl-A-Rama, he's sitting over a table, reading books about marketting and staring at a bowling ball, until he finally seems to come up with a working idea: cue Jump Cut to Homer wildly firing a shotgun into the air in front of the bowling alley while yelling at people to "get their bowling here", as described below.
  • Bittersweet Ending: Homer ends the story with having to quit his dream job and go back to working at the plant with Burns putting up a plaque stating "Don't Forget, You're Here Forever" to crush what's left of his spirit. But when inquired why there's no baby pictures of Maggie, he states there are, just where he needs them most. And we see that that they're in his office, covering the plaque that the words now read "Do it for her".
  • Bond Gun Barrel: In the couch gag, Homer reenacts the James Bond gun barrel sequence, albeit in a bit bloody manner.
  • Bowling for Ratings: Homer quits his job at the Nuclear Power Plant to pursue his dream job at Barney's Bowlarama. Thanks to Maggie, it doesn't last long.
  • Captain Oblivious: Homer towards Marge's pregnancy. First, while Homer is returning home from the bowling alley, Chief Wiggum drives by and compliments him for his "nice work", which is vague enough for Homer to think he is talking about his new job. Then Apu congratulates Homer for the "little bundle of joy", which Homer surmises to be his salary. Next, Moe tells Homer in no uncertain terms that he got Marge pregnant, but Homer believes this is an abstract way of talking about his enjoyment of his job. When he reaches his home, he notices the neighbors have gathered there with presents. He infers that they're showering Marge with "little, tiny, baby-sized gifts", yet he still blows it all off. It isn't until Maude Flanders congratulates Homer on his new job when he finally realizes that Marge is pregnant with a third child.
  • Comically Missing the Point: Homer when the townspeople congratulate him for the new baby, which gets increasingly obvious.

    Moe: Hey, Homer! Way to get Marge pregnant. (laughs)
    Homer: This is getting very abstract, but thank you. I do enjoy working at the bowling alley.

  • Couch Gag: The living room is seen through the barrel of a gun like the intro to James Bond. Homer walks in and fires at the screen, which “bleeds” red and falls.
  • Crossing the Burnt Bridge: Homer literally drives across a wooden bridge and sets fire to it but later has to return to the Power Plant to get his job back after humiliating Burns on his way out.
  • Deranged Animation: Homer's head inflating and exploding.
  • Did Not Think This Through: Homer quits before he's certain he can get another job.
  • "Die Hard" on an X: Parodied (bear in mind, this is something Homer is imagining in the spur of the moment to lie about why there's no pictures of Maggie):

    German Terrorist: Attention, American workers: your plant has been taken over by an all-star team of freelance terrorists.
    Homer: Not on my shift! (jumps into an overhead vent, jumps out of another one and proceeds to kick terrorist ass singlehandedly while tied-up Lenny, Carl and Burns swoon over him).

  • The Ending Changes Everything: It isn't until the final few moments of the episode when the run-of-the-mill flashback episode, which shows Homer in a Jerkass light, turns into one of the most heartwarming episodes in the entire series.
  • Epic Fail: Homer's attempt to market bowling.
  • "Eureka!" Moment: Several people congratulate Homer because Marge had become pregnant with Maggie. Homer, himself unaware of the pregnancy, misinterprets these comments (even the ridiculously direct ones) as regarding his new job.note That's "ridiculously direct", as in "Hey, Homer, way to get Marge pregnant!" "This is getting increasingly abstract, but yes, I do enjoy working at the bowling alley" Then Maude congratulates him on the new job, prompting Homer to respond, "New job? MARGE Food bank cedar city utah PREGNANT!?"
  • Evil Brit: One shows up in Homer's fantasy at the beginning.
  • Evil Is Petty: Burns forcing people coming to beg for their jobs to crawl through a tunnel infested with spiderwebs and dust (literally labeled "Supplicants") and bolting the "don't forget, you're here forever" plaque to the wall of Homer's station to "break what's left of your spirit".
  • Exact Words: Patty and Selma promise not to tell Homer and don't—instead, they tell Springfield's worst gossips, who tell everyone else. To twist the knife further, Patty and Selma even arrange a surprise baby shower for Marge—just before Homer comes home from work.
  • Failed a Spot Check: Homer doesn't get why Marge keeps vomiting every morning and doesn't even realize she's pregnant until Maude Flanders tells Homer, "Congratulations on your new job" (referring to his new job working at the bowling alley).
  • Freak Out: Homer has one after realizing Marge is pregnant with Maggie, giving out a Big "NO!", yelling hysterically and running upstairs. Marge reveals this isn't the first time this happened. When Bart was coming, he nearly tore off all his hair. When Lisa was on the way, he tore off the rest, both time ending with running upstairs while screaming.
  • Gossipy Hens: Aaronson and Zukowski, the two biggest gossips in Springfield.
  • Happiness In Minimum Wage: Homer cleared his debt from his house and first two kids, quit the power plant in grandiose fashion, and happily moved to a much lower paying job at a bowling alley. Shortly afterward, he found out Marge was pregnant with Maggie, which forced him to beg for his old job back.
  • Hypocritical Humor:
    • Homer celebrates quitting from the Power Plant and putting an end to "back-breaking labor" forever. He then gets a job at the bowling alley, which involves much more movement than his job at the plant ever did.
    • When Marge forces the family to spend time together instead of watching Knightboat.

    Marge: Besides, that backtalking boat sets a bad example.
    Bart: Sez you, woman.

  • Incurable Cough of Death: Joey does one when Homer says goodbye to him, implying their plan to visit California one day will likely never happen.
  • Indulgent Fantasy Segue: Homer's flashback begins with him sitting as his workstation, and then suddenly the power cuts out.

    Evil British Voice: Attention American workers, your plant has been taken over by an all-star team of freelance terrorists.
    Homer: Not on my shift!

  • Insane Troll Logic: When Bart and Lisa are talking about what gender the new baby (Maggie) will turn out to be:

    Lisa: I hope it's a girl.
    Bart: You know nothing about genetics, Lis: it goes boy note Bart Simpson, girl note Lisa Simpson, boy note new baby, girl.

  • Interfaith Smoothie: Homer bizarrely starts a prayer with "Dear Lord, the gods have been good to me".
  • Invisible Subtle Difference: When Marge looks through the family photo album:

    Marge: Here's Bart sleeping. Here he is dozing. Here he is after a visit from the sandman. Ooh, here's nappy time, Bart! Here's a cute one — he's all tuckered out.

  • It's All About Me: Zig-zagged with Homer.

    Homer: Aw, I've never been so miserable in all my life. But I can't take it out on Marge and the kids — I've gotta carry the burden all by myself. [walks in] Hi, honey, how are you?
    Marge: Well, actually —
    Homer: Aw, I can't go on with this charade any longer! I hate my job, I hate my life, and ever since I found out about this baby, there's been nothing but bad luck.
    Marge: My contractions started an hour ago.
    Homer: It's just in one ear and out the other with you, isn't it, Marge?

  • Its Pronounced Tropay:

    Mr. Burns: According to company policy, it is now customary to give you the plague.

    Smithers: Uh, actually sir, it's pronounced "plaque".

  • Kick the Dog:
    • "Don't forget; you're here forever." Homer changes the plaque to "Do it for her."
    • There's also Patty and Selma deliberately arranging for Homer to find out about Marge's pregnancy in the worst way possible; Marge even explicitly says that Homer learning from someone other than her would devastate him.
  • Leaning on the Fourth Wall:
    • As Homer begins the Whole Episode Flashback: "Listen carefully and my words will shape images as clear as any TV show."
    • Before the end of the second act, Bart and Lisa get up to leave, with Bart remarking "Dad, you can't expect us to sit here for 30 minutes straight" and Lisa deciding to get charles schwab routing number checking account snack and maybe go to the bathroom. Marge stays on the couch, but spends the break imagining all the products she'd like to buy.
  • Licked by the Dog: As Homer does a bad job of putting up a good front at the hospital, he gives a mock thumbs up. All of a sudden, a tiny hand grabs his thumb, which melts his heart.

    Marge: Homie, I think someone is saying hello.

  • Literal Metaphor: When Homer goes to the power plant to get his old job back, he's forced to crawl through a hole labeled "supplicants". He enters Mr. Burns's office on his hands and knees, dusty and coughing.

    Burns: So. Come crawling back, eh?
    Homer: Seems like the classy thing to do would be not to call attention to it.

  • Morally Ambiguous Doctorate: Doctor Hibbert gets a very dark moment when Marge goes to him about her pregnancy, and tells her that if the baby is unwanted, a healthy newborn can reach up to $50,000 on the black market. when Marge reacts in alarm, he covers himself by saying it was just a test.

    Hibbert: If you'd reacted any differently, you'd be in jail by now. Just a test! (he laughs nervously)

  • My Secret Pregnancy: Marge, by this time sporting a pretty obvious bump, makes her sisters promise not to tell Homer, because she wants to be the one to tell him, and she's nervous about how he's going to take it. They promise not to tell Homer. (But not the two biggest gossips in Springfield.)
  • Narrative Backpedaling: Marge does not let Homer get away with a single embellishment on the story:
    • Homer begins his story with him thwarting a terrorist attack at the power plant, but Marge forces him to tell the story straight.
    • When Homer insists his breakdown over Marge's pregnancy was a one-time thing, Marge halts the story to instigate flashbacks, showing he went nuts for all three pregnancies.
    • Not only did Homer's head not explode randomly, but his bottom's a little bigger.
    • A third instance of the trope was subverted when Homer told the family about his failed attempt to attract customers. Homer shot a rifle in the air while shouting "Bowling here!" Lisa asked Marge to make him "tell the story right" and Marge dejectedly explains "That's what really happened".
  • Negative Continuity: The two times Homer reacted to Marge being pregnant with Bart and Lisa were vastly different than what was shown on "I Married Marge"note 1.) Homer and Marge weren't married nor were they actually living together when they discovered that Marge was pregnant with Bart, 2.) They were in Dr. Hibbert's office, where Dr. Hibbert himself was the one who informed them that Marge was pregnant, and 3.) Homer yelled "D'oh!" so loudly that a man in traction felt bad for him and "Lisa's First Word."note  1.) Homer, Marge and Bart were living in an apartment on the Lower East Side of Springfield and 2.) When Marge first told Homer that she was is michigan on eastern or central time again, he was actually happy about having another baby—at least until Bart flushed his car keys down the toilet
  • New Baby Episode: When Bart asks why there are no pictures of Maggie Homer tells the story homer simpson do it for her Maggie's birth. After paying off his debts, Homer quits his well paying job at the power plant and gets his dream job as a pin-monkey, but after Marge reveals she's pregnant with Maggie, Homer tries, and fails, to ramp up business at the bowling alley to get a raise, and is mrs dc america 2019 when he has to beg Mr. Burns for his old job to make ends meet. At the very end, Homer reveals that Maggie's pictures are in his work station, to serve as inspiration as to why he still works at the plant.
  • No Good Deed Goes Unpunished: Barney succeeds in getting Homer a job at the bowling alley but gets instantly fired so Homer can take his place.
  • Noodle Incident: Al tells Homer to bring a spare pair of pants to work. When Homer asks why, Al says "When it happens, you'll know".
  • "Not Making This Up" Disclaimer: Homer trying to attract customers by firing a shotgun into the air while yelling "Bowling! Get your bowling here!" actually happened, despite being outlandish enough for Lisa to consider it an embellishment of the story. Considering he tried to do it earlier, you can't blame her for thinking that.

    Lisa: (After hearing the part about the shotgun) Mom make dad tell the story right!

    Marge: (Resigned tone) That's what really happened.

    Lisa: Oh.

  • Plot Tailored to the Party: Parodied, as the family watch Knight Boat, who's chasing a set of starfish poachers. As they reach land, the boat points out a convenient nearby canal, much to Bart and Lisa's annoyance.

    Lisa: Oh, every week, there's a canal.
    Bart: Or a fjord.
    Lisa: On an inlet.
    Homer: QUIET! I will not hear another word against the boat!

  • Pursue the Dream Job: Homer quit the Springfield Nuclear Power Plant to become a pin-monkey at the local bowling alley as soon as he got out of debt. Once he learned that Marge was pregnant with Maggie, however, he tried to get a raise by attracting more customers, but was ultimately forced to give up the job and go back to the power plant.
  • Series Continuity Error:
    • Homer runs past a framed picture of Lisa on the stairs, despite both instances being set before Lisa was even born!
    • Homer is shown working in his usual office at the power plant in the time before Maggie was born. However, Homer worked as a basic laborer/technician long after Maggie was born, and didn't get an office until he was made into the plant's safety inspector in "Homer's Odyssey."
    • Marge and Homer are depicted as living in their house on Evergreen Terrace when Marge was pregnant with Bart, even though "I Married Marge" and "Lisa's First Word" had respectively shown that the two were still living with Marge's mother when Bart was born, and that they didn't move into Evergreen Terrace until shortly before Lisa's birth.
    • Ruth Powers is one of the guests at Marge's baby shower, despite the fact that she didn't meet the Simpson family for the first time until she moved in near them, after Maggie's birth.
    • There's still a picture of Maggie on the wall during the flashbacks even though she hasn't been born yet.
  • Sexy Discretion Shot: Subverted in this scene after Homer and Marge spent a romantic evening celebrating their new life:

    Homer:[sighs] I love you, Marge.
    Marge: I love you too, Homey.
    Homer: Everything in our lives is finally perfectly balanced. I hope things stay exactly like this forever.
    Marge: Mm-hmm.
    [cut to several sperm with Homer's head racing to an egg, then to Homer demonstrating how they swim]
    Marge: Did you have to be so graphic?
    Homer: It's OK, Marge: they pave the way for this kind of filth in school.

  • Shoe Shine, Mister?: Homer works with a shoeshine boy called Joey in the bowling alley.
  • Shout-Out:
  • Soul-Crushing Desk Job: Homer is well established as hating his job as a safety inspector at the Nuclear Plant. He wants to work in a bowling alley. Funny that Homer happily trades his cushy job with a place where he has to work manually or deal with dirty shoes. Homer ecstatically quits, making sure Mr. Burns, the owner of the plant, knows how much Homer hated it. Then Marge realizes she's pregnant and Homer has to beg for his old, higher-paying job back. Mr. Burns re-hires him, but has a plaque mounted in Homer's small office that reads "Don't forget: You're here forever." Homer uses pictures of Maggie to cover letters in such a way that the plaque now reads: "Do it for her."
  • Sperm as People: Maggie's conception is depicted with a bunch of clumsy, Homer-headed sperm cells. Once one hits the ovum, we cut out of the flashback to Homer pantomiming a wriggling sperm as the others chew him out for the pointless gross detail.
  • Status Quo Is God: After finally earning enough money to pay off his bills, Homer quits his job at the Nuclear Plant and pursues his dream job at Barney's Bowlarama. Thanks to Maggie, Homer is forced to quit his dream job and get his old job at the Nuclear Plant back.
  • Swiss Cheese Security: Nobody at the plant stop Homer from driving Mr. Burns around while playing his head like a bongo drum.
  • Tempting Fate: Marge is worried about Homer quitting his cushy job at the nuclear plant to go and work at the bowling alley. To reassure her, he shows her a budget he's done, which will allow him to support the family comfortably "as long as nothing changes." Then Marge finds out she's pregnant again.
  • Tranquil Fury: Jokingly turned Up to Eleven when Homer plays Mr. Burns' head like a bongo drum:

    Burns:(Calmly) Oh, I should be resisting this but I'm paralysed with rage!

  • Trees into Toothpicks: Homer wonders what happens to bowling pins after they get swept away. It turns out an automated assembly line throws out the used pins and makes new ones out of one fully-grown tree each.
  • Unreliable Narrator:
    • Homer begins the story with him singlehandedly taking down a terrorist raid on the plant before Marge intervenes and makes him tell homer simpson do it for her real story.
    • Bart hijacks the story and causes Homer's head to explode. Homer takes over and has to be corrected about his missing head and gut size.
    • Lisa accuses Homer of this when he tells them about his brilliant marketing strategy involving randomly firing a shotgun into the air. Marge laments that's what really happened.
  • Villainous Demotivator: Burns puts a literal one on the wall of Homer's workstation.
  • Visual Pun: After quitting the Power Plant, Homer sets fire to a bridge as he leaves.
  • Weird Weather: Homer is going back to the Nuclear Plant to get his old job back, having to give up his dream job of working in a bowling alley, in order to support his now five-member family. When he left the bowling alley, they gave him a satin jacket as a souvenir. As homer simpson do it for her trudges towards the plant, an acid rain shower hits him, disintegrating the jacket but leaving everything else untouched.

Источник: https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Recap/TheSimpsonsS6E13AndMaggieMakesThree
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