sun rises in the east and sets in the west

Aug 26, 2012 - "The Sun rises in the East & sets in the West in Minnesota's "Twin Cities." Finally got a "Minneapolis Moonrise" pic to match my amazing. This section provides the suggestion for approaching topics like "Sun rises in the east and sets in the west" in GD. The earth's relationship to the sun can help you to determine direction on earth. The sun always rises in the east and sets in the west, but not exactly due.

: Sun rises in the east and sets in the west

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Sun rises in the east and sets in the west

Sun rises in the east and sets in the west -

  1. DAY AND NIGHT RESULTS FROM THE ROTATION OF THE EARTH.
    • WHAT CAUSES DAY AND NIGHT?
      • Materials: a globe which will be used to locate where students live, and a light source for the sun.
      • The instructor will show students where they live on the Earth.
      • Students are asked how they would use the light source to make it daytime on their part of the Earth. The expected action would be to have the pupils shine the light over the region of Earth where they live.
      • The class will then be asked to demonstrate how it would be possible to make it nighttime on the same portion of the planet which is currently experiencing day. There are numerous responses which can be given by pupils:
        • They turn off the light.
        • They close their eyes.
        • They place their bodies between the Earth and the sun.
        • They move the sun to a position near the South Pole or place the sun underneath the table which is supporting the Earth.
        • They revolve the sun to the other side of the Earth.
        • They will take a cloth or piece of paper and cover the Earth.
        • They rotate (spin) the Earth, so that the portion of the planet which is in day, spins into a nighttime position. This is the correct response.
  2. WHAT CAUSES DAY AND NIGHT? Alternate approach:
    • Materials: a rotating chair and a light source to represent the sun.
    • THE TEACHER SITS ON A ROTATING STOOL OR CHAIR and asks the children, sitting on the floor, where they are located. The answer which is sought is "in front of you" however, this response is rarely given. When the teacher notes that he/she is sitting in front of his/her pupils, the students will readily accept this as a correct response.
    • THE TEACHER THEN ROTATES THE CHAIR until her/his back is towards the children and repeats the same question, "Where are you?" The children�s' response is always, "In back of you." This situation is repeated several times.
    • THE TEACHER MAKES A BIG DEAL ABOUT THE FACT THAT IT IS THE STUDENTS WHO HAVE BEEN MOVING WHILE THE TEACHER HAS BEEN STATIONARY. The students insist that the teacher has been spinning while the teacher insists that it has been he/she that has been rotating. The cunundrum is resolved through a vote in which the students win.
    • THE TEACHER THEN BECOMES THE EARTH AND USES THE SPINNING CHAIR ANALOGY TO HAVE THE STUDENT'S DESCRIBE DAY AND NIGHT. The student's eyes become the city in which the student lives and the nose becomes a flagpole or a familiar landmark that the students recognize. The sun (light bulb) is placed in back of the pupils. During the day the sun is in front of the students. At night the sun is in back of them because the Earth spins or rotates the person into that position.
  3. THE CAUSE OF DAY AND NIGHT IS DUE TO THE EARTH'S ROTATION (SPINNING). The rotating Earth makes the sun rise, set, and move across the sky.
    • Materials: light bulb sun, large cardboard arrows to act as counterclockwise direction indicators.
    • Demonstrations of day and night: Two approaches:
      • Approach one is passive: A rotating globe illuminated by a stationary light source can be used to demonstrate day and night. The globe should have a marking on it so that the children can readily identify their location on the planet. The globe should always be rotated in a counterclockwise direction. "Round and round, the Earth does go. Where it stops, nobody knows." When the Earth does stop, students tell the teacher whether the Earth has stopped in a day or night position. This is also an appropriate opportunity to introduce the concepts of morning and evening.
      • Approach two is active:
        • STUDENTS' HEADS WILL BECOME THE EARTH. Their eyes will become their city looking into space. Their noses will become a prominent building, landmark, or a flagpole. A light bulb or an overhead projector will serve as the sun.
        • DAY AND NIGHT CAN BE MADE INTO A GAME in which pupils rotate their bodies (like the Earth) to make it day and night. Before beginning the demonstrations, students should practice rotating counterclockwise or towards the left. Cardboard arrows can be placed on each of the classroom walls to designate the direction of Earth�s rotation. During this demonstration, students will often begin to jump into the positions which will facilitate a day or night condition. Teachers should stress that the Earth rotates smoothly and slowly, and that it always turns in the same direction. Students should spin their bodies in the direction of the arrows to create this consistency of motion.
  4. THE SUN APPEARS TO BE MOVING ACROSS THE SKY BECAUSE THE EARTH IS ROTATING. An excellent method of demonstrating this concept is to have students spin very rapidly. Pupils should be prompted to try to imagine that the room is spinning while they are rotating. When directed to stop, students will realize upon further questioning that it was not the room which was moving, but their rotating bodies which made it appear as if the room was spinning. Although the sun appears to move in the sky as it travels from its rising to its setting position, it is really the spinning Earth which is causing this illusion.
  5. THE SUN RISES IN THE EAST AND IT SETS IN THE WEST. AROUND LUNCHTIME THE SUN IS IN THE SOUTH. The locations of sunrise and sunset are consistent enough so that they can be used to define directions.
    • The instructor asks the students to stop rotating when it is day.
    • STUDENTS CAN POINT TO THE RISING OR SETTING SUN WITH THEIR NEAREST ARM. The same arm is always used to point to the sun at sunrise and sunset. If the direction of rotation is counterclockwise, students will always point to the setting sun with their right arm and the rising sun with their left arm. The sun rises in the same direction. The sun sets in the same direction. These locations do not represent the same position on the horizon.
    • EVENING: After students comprehend the concepts of day and night, students will then rotate counterclockwise until the sun is barely visible from the corner of their right eye. Students point to the sun with their closest arm. The sun is going down to the right. It is now evening. The students continue to rotate until it is nighttime.
    • MORNING: The same procedure is then repeated for morning; only this time the students note when they first glimpse the sun after it was dark. Students point to the sun with their closest arm. This time the sun is rising to the left. The rotating game can now be expanded to include day, night, morning, and evening.
    • CONSISTENCY OF SUNRISE AND SUNSET POSITIONS: The sun always rises close to the same place in the morning and sets near the same place in the evening. These positions are called east and west respectively and represent two of the four directions.
    • THE RISING AND THE SETTING POSITIONS OF THE SUN ARE OPPOSITE TO ONE ANOTHER. East and west are opposite directions.
    • SOUTH AND NORTH: At noon the sun is in the south. Shadows point to the north.
    • NOON: The students will then place the sun in the middle of their "sky" between the rising and setting positions of the sun. At this point it is noon (lunchtime), halfway between morning and evening. Around lunchtime, the sun is in the south. The day and night game can be expanded using morning (east), noon (south), evening (west), and night.
    • NEWS is a great acronym for having students remember the four directions: north, east, west, and south.
  1. The concepts concerning day and night and evening and morning, where the students become the Earth, and a light bulb substitutes for the sun, will be reinforced. Pupils will also be asked to rotate very rapidly using their imaginations to make the room look like it is spinning. It is not the sun that is moving across the sky, but the rotation of the Earth which makes it look as if the sun is moving.
  2. Students will then be seated in the chamber and given a simulation of day and night. The earth will rotate so that the sun moves from its noontime position and returns to its noontime position. Students will be asked to determine when the Earth begins to rotate by clapping.
    • Students will then be required to predict the location of sunset and sunrise by indicating these positions with a pointer. These locations will be marked in the Planetarium and their observations tested by allowing the sun to set and rise again.
    • Several trials may be needed to determine the exact locations, but it will become abundantly clear that sunrise and sunset occur in approximately the same positions (directions). These places are called east and west respectively.
    • As part of the sunrise and sunset demonstrations, students will collectively determine the location in the sky where the sun reaches its highest position. This may also require several trials. This position occurs in the south at noon.
    • When west, east, and south have been determined a student will be asked to hypothesize where the direction north would be located.
    • The planetarium will then be darkened so that students can identify the location of the star pattern of the Big Dipper. The pointer stars of the Dipper will then be used to determine the position of the North Star, also called Polaris.
    • Students will then be asked to look at a slide showing a 10 minute exposure of the north circumpolar region. A volunteer will find the only star in the photograph which is not moving. The same student will then be asked to find the only stationary star in the Planetarium while the Earth is make to rotate. Students will identify this star as the North Star or Polaris. Directly below the North Star can be found the direction north. This position will then be compared to the hypothesized position of north made by the student a few minutes before.
    • Polaris is not the brightest star of the nighttime sky. Students will be asked to name the brightest star in the sky (sun) and to observe that Polaris does not even come close to becoming the brightest star of the night. The North Star is the 49th brightest star in the sky if the sun is included.
    • The program will conclude with a method of locating the four cardinal points by moving clockwise once the direction north is determined.
      • North never Eats Soggy Waffles...
      • North never Eats Shredded Wheat...
      • North never Eats Soggy Watermelons...
      • North never Eats Squished Worms...
      • WE: If you are looking north, then the direction west is to your left and east is to your right. This spells the word "we." South is then opposite to north.
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PROGRAMS MENU

Источник: https://astronomy.org/programs/sun-directions.html

The sun appears to rise on the eastern horizon and sets on the western horizon. How much does the location of the sun rising and setting change throughout the year and depending upon where your viewpoint is, i.e., true East, true West, etc.

Irrespective of where you are on the globe, the Sun will always rise exactly East and set exactly West on two days: March 21 and September 21 which are the two equinoxes. As to the second part, it is a little complicated:

Consider an arbitrary location on Earth (to make matters simple, consider a place in the northern hemisphere). Now, the celestial north pole (where the star Polaris resides) will be at an angle above the horizon and the angle is exactly equal to the latitude of the place. Imagine yourself facing Polaris (so that you are facing north exactly). Then East will be to your right and West will be to your left. Now, draw a circle which passes through East and West and whose plane is exactly perpendicular to the line joining you and Polaris. This circle marks the path of the Sun from dawn to dusk on the two equinoxes.

Now, draw a circle which is exactly parallel to the first circle, but which are separated from the first circle by 23.5 degrees at the zenith towards Polaris. This marks the path of the Sun during summer solstice and the place where this circle cuts the horizons will mark the place where the Sun will rise and set on the day of summer solstice. A similar circle which is separated from the first circle by 23.5 degrees at zenith towards south will mark the path of the Sun on winter solstice.

Thus, the Sun will rise north of true East and set north of true West during summer whereas during winter, the Sun will rise south of true East and set south of true West.

The exact location where the Sun will rise and set will vary widely depending on the place. Beyond the Arctic circle, there will be some times of the year where the Sun stays in the horizon for all 24 hours.

 

This page was last updated on Jan 28, 2019.

About the Author

Jagadheep D. Pandian

Jagadheep D. Pandian

Jagadheep built a new receiver for the Arecibo radio telescope that works between 6 and 8 GHz. He studies 6.7 GHz methanol masers in our Galaxy. These masers occur at sites where massive stars are being born. He got his Ph.D from Cornell in January 2007 and was a postdoctoral fellow at the Max Planck Insitute for Radio Astronomy in Germany. After that, he worked at the Institute for Astronomy at the University of Hawaii as the Submillimeter Postdoctoral Fellow. Jagadheep is currently at the Indian Institute of Space Scence and Technology.

Источник: http://curious.astro.cornell.edu/our-solar-system/161-our-solar-system/the-earth/day-night-cycle/184-how-does-the-location-of-sunrise-and-sunset-change-throughout-the-year-advanced

My first thought was to get up at sunrise and try and find the sun, and do the same at sunset. Getting up early involves getting up early, and trying to find the sun at night can be tricky because you have to catch it before it disappears behind trees.

A better, and probably more accurate way is to use a compas app on a smart phone. The position of the sun varies by latitude and time of year, but there are calculators online that will tell you the exact heading of the sun at any time of day.



  1. Find our when the sun rises and sets in your area.
  2. Type the times into a sun calculator like http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/grad/solcalc/azel.html to get the headings for sun rise and sun set. 
  3. Run the compass app and rotate until you're pointing at the sunrise and sunset headings.

In Atlanta, June 27th, sunrise and sunset bearings:

Sunrise: 6:30am, azimuth: 61 degrees

Sunset at 8:52pm, azimuth: 298.99 degrees

Actually, this site makes it even easier: http://www.suncalc.net/#/33.8636,-84.2212,19/2013.06.27/12:38

The think orange and yellow lines show the sunset and sunrise angles, complete with a map so you can visualize. The thin orange line is the sun's trajectory throughout the day, and the light yellow region is how it varies throughout the year. We're almost on the summer solstice in this picture, so the orange line is all the way on one side. My one issue is that it makes it look like the sun is on the South side of my house, when in reality, I think it just stays in the Northern part of the sky all day.

In the summer, near the solstice, the axis of the Earth points more towards the sun than any other time (about 23 degrees). This not only makes the longest day, but also puts the sun mostly in the Northern half (for my address) all day long. The sun doesn't rise and set in East and West, but rather in the Northeast and NorthWest. 

The take-home of all this is that one side of our house will get a lot more sun than the other.

Источник: http://www.imponderablethings.com/2013/06/how-to-find-out-where-sun-rises-and.html

Why Does the Sun "Rise" and "Set"?
Exploring the Earth's Daily Cycle

As the Earth rotates, different locations on Earth pass through the sun's light. The animation shows how that looks hour by hour (for 4 hours). As your town turns toward the sun and begins to enter its light, the sun seems to rise in the east. As your town begins to leave the sun's light and enter darkness, it appears to set in the west.

Try this!
Shine a flashlight on the side of a ball and rotate the ball counterclockwise. (You can figure out which way to turn it by looking down on the ball from above and thinking of a clock face.) Watch what happens to the light and dark areas as the ball turns. This is what happens on the earth as it rotates toward the east (counterclockwise).

Back to Beginning

Источник: https://journeynorth.org/tm/mclass/SunriseSetAns.html

See also: Moon

The sun is a celestial body that provides light for the Overworld.

Daytime[]

Main article: Daylight cycle

The sun and moon rise in the east and set in the west.

When the player creates a new world, the time is set to dawn and the sun starts on the horizon. As time passes, it slowly moves across the sky. As the sun sets, the moon rises. Overall, daytime lasts 10 minutes (in real-time).

Sunlight[]

Sunlight refers to the light, particularly sky light, which illuminates all blocks directly below the sky, and which do not have a shadow cast over them by an opaque block or by inclement weather. Clouds themselves do not cast shadows; however, during inclement weather (rain and snow), the sky darkens and reduces the amount of sunlight in the world. During these storms, the ambient light value during the day is reduced to 12 from the usual 15, and in thunderstorms the light level is reduced to 10 although treated as 5, allowing hostile mobs to spawn.

When the sun rises and sets, blocks exposed to sunlight change their light level depending on the angle of the sun, giving the effect of gradually getting lighter at dawn and gradually getting darker at dusk. However, shadows of blocks are not affected by the position of the sun in the sky, making sundials impossible.

Illumination decreases with depth underground until ultimately there is no illumination all. A gap or a vertical shaft in the ceiling of a cavern allows sunlight to filter in.

Sunlight can be used to turn dirt blocks into grass blocks, as long as there is an illuminated grass block adjacent to the dirt. Grass blocks spread quickest when exposed to sunlight at the high-point of the day (time 6000).

Effects on mobs[]

Sunlight affects how certain mobsspawn.

Except for bats, which require light level 4 or lower to spawn, passive mobs require a minimum light level of 9 (in Java Edition) or 12 (mooshrooms, polar bears, and rabbits in Bedrock Edition) or 7 (all other land animals in Bedrock Edition) to spawn; therefore, they do not spawn at night.

Hostile mobs, in contrast, do not spawn in direct sunlight at light level 7‌[JE only][verify] or 8‌[BE only] or above. Skeletons, zombies, zombie villagers, strays, drowned and phantoms are set on fire for 160 ticks upon entering an area fully illuminated by sunlight, and they try to avoid such areas. They do not burn while in water, in the rain, wearing a helmet, or in the shade. Spiders become neutral while in direct sunlight, until attacked by the player. Endermen teleport away from players in sunlight. All other hostile mobs, such as creepers, slimes, and silverfish, are completely unaffected by sunlight.

Boss mobs do not take damage from sunlight; they spawn regardless of the light level.

History[]

A picture of a sunset over a redwood forest in modern minecraft.

Issues[]

Issues relating to "Sun" are maintained on the bug tracker. Report issues there.

Trivia[]

  • The sun is visibly larger during sunrise and sunset.
  • If the player is underwater or underground and looks at the sun, it appears the same as the sun at sunset. This is due to the way the sun is rendered when exposed to the sky.
  • Standing or flying at a height above the terrain of approximately 1.4× the render distance, the sun appears opposite to the moon in the sky, making it seem almost as if the player is in space.

Gallery[]

  • Example sunset seen from the top of a jungletree.

  • The sun viewed from high up, making it seem like the player is in space.

  • In Bedrock Edition, when looking toward the sun. The sky gets slightly darker and the sun slightly larger. (You may need to click the image to see it better.)

  • The sun would look like this, if the player looks away or if the world is heading into the night.

  • Sunlight influences shadows on entities in Bedrock Edition.

  • The previous screenshot from the opposite angle.

  • The texture of the sun from the default resource pack.

  • River running between Forest and Mountains biome with sunset in the background.

  • The sun sets over a rising Extreme Hills in the background.

  • Sunset over a desert and forest. Also village can be seen on a hill on the left side.

  • Savanna and desert biomes in suset.

  • Sunset over a desert with village.

References[]

Источник: https://minecraft.fandom.com/wiki/Sun

Fall in Love with the Sunrises and Sunsets in NC's Brunswick Islands

In our southernmost corner of North Carolina, one of the South’s most intriguing natural phenomena occurs every fall through winter.

Named one of “10 Incredible Phenomena You Have to See in Fall” by Weather.com, the south-facing beaches of North Carolina’s Brunswick Islands have the rare distinction of running east-west as they parallel the shore. Beginning in late fall, this orientation means that you can sit on Oak Island, Caswell Beach, Sunset Beach, Ocean Isle Beach or Holden Beach and watch both the sunrise and sunset over the ocean without having to move your beach chair.

Sun setting over the ocean in North Carolina's Brunswick Islands

What’s the reason for the natural phenomenon and why does it only occur late fall through early spring?  To find the answer, we went to the experts – the folks who are on a first-name basis with the stars at the Ingram Planetarium in Sunset Beach. The short answer, according to Ingram Planetarium experts, is that, "Because our beaches are generally oriented to face south and since the sun is far enough south in the late fall through early spring, the sun appears to both rise and set over the ocean off our shoreline.”

Sunset in Ocean Isle Beach, NC.

But, why can’t you see the same thing in the summer, you ask?

Our experts tell us that while we say the sun rises in the East and sets in the West, this only occurs exactly in the East and exactly in the West at the Vernal and Autumnal Equinoxes (first day of Spring and first day of Fall).  As the Earth revolves around the sun, the sun appears to move north and south of the equator by quite a number of degrees. In the fall, winter and early spring, the sun is so far south of the equator that it rises not in the east, but southeast, and sets not in the west, but southwest.

Ingram Planetarium in Sunset Beach strives to stimulate interest in and a broader understanding of our earth, our solar system and our universe. The Planetarium even hosts star shows, laser music shows and programs about astronomy, science and space exploration throughout the year.

DSC_9509_Sunset-Beach_Ingram-Planitarium

When you visit this fall and winter, take the sunrise/sunset challenge at North Carolina’s Brunswick Islands. Wake up early in the morning and experience the vibrant colors of the expanding sun as it climbs higher and higher over the ocean, awakening the sky with every inch of radiance. Or, capture the last glimpses of daylight as the last effervescent tones of the sun expand over the vast horizon and paints the ocean – all in the same day. We are confident you won’t want to miss this bucket-list activity for it is one of the most scenic fall-nomena this season. 

Sunrise_Sunset Beach

To learn more about North Carolina’s Brunswick Islands, and to plan your trip, visit www.NCBrunswick.com.

Источник: https://www.ncbrunswick.com/blog/post/fall-in-love-with-the-sunrises-and-sunsets-in-ncs-brunswick-islands/

The Sun Rises and Sets

Now I keep the class at their desks and I ask them to talk to their shoulder partner, then share across the table, and last the entire class shares what pattern they notice as the sun moves across the sky. This is a nice strategy to help my students reflect upon their new knowledge. I say, "Share your notes about the pattern you notice as the sun moves across the sky." Hopefully my students notice the sun travels from east to west in our sky." I listen closely as my students talk, and if I see a group not talking I just ask sun rises in the east and sets in the west to share their notes. If they cannot read their notes I just read them for them, or ask their partner to read them.

Next, I say, "Please add anything you need to on your notes." Then I ask the students to share across the table by saying, "Please tell the group across the table what you notice in the pattern of the sun from the text and the picture." Then I listen to make sure each child is participating and is saying the right thing. If they are confused I reread the text or explain the picture. Then I say, "Are you sure your notes represent your understanding? Change them so they show what you know now." 

Last, I ask for a volunteer to share the pattern they observed, read about, and made notes documenting. Then I listen and encourage the rest of the class to listen by saying, "Be central pacific bank atm locations you listen, so you can add to what they say. This is a positive behavior strategy to focus the class on what I want sun rises in the east and sets in the west to do instead of correctly unwanted behavior. Now, I say, "Will anyone add to what their peer said. Do you agree or disagree and why?" This is how I teach the students to build upon the ideas of their peers.

Источник: https://betterlesson.com/lesson/633365/the-sun-rises-and-sets

The sun appears to rise on the eastern horizon and sets on the western horizon. How much does the location of the sun rising and setting change throughout the year and depending upon where your viewpoint is, i.e., true East, true West, etc.

Irrespective of where you are on the globe, the Sun will always rise exactly East and set exactly West on two days: March 21 and September 21 which are the two equinoxes. As to the second part, it is a little complicated:

Consider an arbitrary location on Earth (to make matters simple, consider a place in the northern hemisphere). Now, the celestial north pole (where the star Polaris resides) will be at an angle above the horizon and the angle is exactly equal to the latitude of the place. Imagine yourself facing Polaris (so that you are facing north exactly). Then East will be to your right and West will be to your left. Now, draw a circle which passes through East and West and whose plane is exactly perpendicular to the line joining you and Polaris. This circle marks the path of the Sun from dawn to dusk on the two equinoxes.

Now, draw a circle which is exactly parallel to the first circle, but which are separated from the first circle by 23.5 degrees at the zenith towards Polaris. This marks the path of the Sun during summer solstice sun rises in the east and sets in the west the place where this circle cuts the horizons will mark the place where the Sun will rise and set on the day of summer solstice. A similar circle which is separated sun rises in the east and sets in the west the first circle by 23.5 degrees at zenith towards south will mark sun rises in the east and sets in the west path of the Sun on winter solstice.

Thus, the Sun will rise north of true East and set north of true West during summer whereas during winter, the Sun will rise south of true East and set south of true West.

The exact location where the Sun will rise and set will vary widely depending on the place. Beyond the Arctic circle, there will be some times of the year where the Sun stays in the horizon for all 24 hours.

 

This page was last updated on Jan 28, 2019.

About the Author

Jagadheep D. Pandian

Jagadheep D. Pandian

Jagadheep built a new receiver for the Arecibo radio telescope that works between 6 and 8 GHz. He studies 6.7 GHz methanol masers in our Galaxy. These masers occur at sites where massive stars are being born. He got his Ph.D from Cornell in January 2007 and was a postdoctoral fellow at the Max Planck Insitute for Radio Astronomy in Germany. After that, he worked at the Institute for Astronomy at the University of Hawaii as the Submillimeter Postdoctoral Fellow. Jagadheep is currently at the Indian Institute of Space Scence and Technology.

Источник: http://curious.astro.cornell.edu/our-solar-system/161-our-solar-system/the-earth/day-night-cycle/184-how-does-the-location-of-sunrise-and-sunset-change-throughout-the-year-advanced

Where Does the Sun Rise and Set?

The sun rises from the east and progressively moves westwards as sunset approaches. Locations in the eastern side of the earth experience sunlight before locations in the west which results in a difference in time zones. Regardless of whether you are in the northern or southern hemisphere, the sun will always rise in the east and set in the west. The sun, the stars, and the moon rise in the east and always set in the west because the earth spins towards the east.

Why Does the Sun Rise in the East?

Every morning, depending on the moment of the earth's rotation, we see the sun rise from its horizon in the east. The rising and setting of the sun varies all year round depending on a number of reasons. The timing of the sunrise is affected by the altitude, time zone, longitude, and latitude of the viewer. The axial tilt of the Earth highly affects sunrise as well as the movement of the planet on the annual elliptical orbit.

The Equinox

When we say that the sun rises in the east and sets in the west we have to understand the issue of the equinox. The sun only rises in the exact east and sets in the exact west two days of the year. Irrespective of where one is on the universe the sun will be seen to rise from the exact east and set in the exact west on March 21 and September 21. The two dates are known as fall equinox and spring equinox. On other days, the sunrise will alter and rise in either north of exact east or south of exact west. The sun rising in extreme northeast and setting in the extreme northwest is observed during the summer solstice. In winter solstice, the sun rises in farthest southeast and sets in the furthest southwest. The solstice is caused by tilting of the earth as it eccentrics on the orbit.

The Position of the Sun in Relation to the Planet

Despite the observation that the sun rises in the east and sets in the west, it actually stays in one position. The sun is centered in the solar system, therefore, it neither rises nor sets. The observation of rising and setting of the sun is due to the rotation of the earth. The process takes place every 24 hours and the rotation is towards the east. As the earth rotates clockwise, the sunlight reaches different parts of the earth at different times. The first points to receive the sun rays are in the east. As the points begin to leave the light of the sun due to progression in the rotation, darkness begins to set in. The general appearance is that it set to the west. The fact is that the sun appears to be revolving around us basically because the earth not only orbits it but also does rotate on its axis as it is revolving.

Daniel Maina Wambugu in World Facts

Источник: https://www.worldatlas.com/articles/why-does-the-sun-rise-in-the-east-and-set-in-the-west.html

The solar system is made up of the Sun, the planets that orbit the Sun, their satellites, dwarf planets and many, many small objects, like asteroids and comets. All of these objects move and we can see these movements. We notice the Sun rises in the eastern sky in the morning and sets in the western sky in the evening. We observe different stars in the sky at different times of the year. When ancient people made these observations, they imagined that the sky was actually moving while the Earth stood still. In 1543, Nicolaus Copernicus (Figure 24.21) proposed a radically different idea: the Earth and the other planets make regular revolutions around the Sun. He also suggested that the Earth rotates once a day on its axis. Copernicus’ idea slowly gained acceptance and today we base our view of motions in the solar system on his work. We also now know that everything in the universe is moving.

Figure 24.21: Nicholas Copernicus.

In this lesson you will learn about how the movements of the Earth, Moon, and Sun affect different phenomena on Earth, including day and night, the seasons, tides, and phases of the Moon.

Lesson Objectives

  • Describe how Earth’s movements affect seasons and cause day and night.
  • Explain solar and lunar eclipses.
  • Describe the phases of the Moon and explain why they occur.
  • Explain how movements of the Earth and Moon affect Earth’s tides.

Positions and Movements

Earlier we discussed Earth’s rotation and revolution. The Earth rotates once on its axis about every 24 hours. If you were to look at Earth from the North Pole, it would be spinning counterclockwise. As the Earth rotates, observers on Earth see the Sun moving across the sky from east to west with the beginning of each new day. We often say that the Sun is “rising” or “setting”, but actually it is the Earth’s rotation that gives us the perception of the Sun rising up or setting over the horizon. When we look at the Moon or the stars at night, they also seem to rise in the east and set in the west. Earth’s rotation is also responsible for this. As Earth turns, the Moon and stars change position in our sky.

Earth’s Day and Night

Another effect of Earth’s rotation is that we have a cycle of daylight and darkness approximately every 24 hours. This is called a day. As Earth rotates, the side of Earth facing the Sun experiences daylight, and the opposite side (facing away from the Sun) experiences darkness or nighttime. Since the Earth completes one rotation in about 24 hours, this is the time it takes to complete one sun rises in the east and sets in the west cycle. As the Earth rotates, different places on Earth experience sunset and sunrise at a different time. As you move towards the poles, summer and winter days have different amounts of daylight hours in a day. For example, in the Northern hemisphere, we begin summer on June 21. At this point, the Earth’s North Pole is pointed directly toward the Sun. Therefore, areas north of the equator experience longer days and shorter nights because the northern half of the Earth is pointed toward the Sun. Since the southern half of the Earth is pointed away from the Sun at that point, they have the opposite effect—longer nights and shorter days.

For people in the Northern hemisphere, winter begins on December 21. At this point, it is Earth’s South Pole that is tilted toward the Sun, and so there are shorter days and longer nights for those who are north of the equator.

Earth’s Seasons

It is a common misconception that summer is warm and winter is cold because the Sun is closer to Earth in the summer and farther away from it during the winter. Remember that seasons are caused by the 23.5 degree tilt of Earth’s axis of rotation and Earth’s yearly revolution around the Sun (Figure 24.22). This results in one part of the Earth being more directly exposed to rays from the Sun sun rises in the east and sets in the west the other part. The part tilted away from the Sun experiences a cool season, while the sun rises in the east and sets in the west tilted toward the Sun experiences a warm season. Seasons change as the Earth continues its revolution, causing the hemisphere tilted away from or towards the Sun to change accordingly. When it is winter in the Northern hemisphere, it is summer in the Southern hemisphere, and vice versa.

Figure 24.22: The Earth’s tilt on its axis leads to one hemisphere facing the Sun more than the other hemisphere and gives rise to seasons.

NORTHERN HEMISPHERE SUMMER
The North Pole is tilted towards the Sun and the Sun’s rays strike the Northern Hemisphere more directly in summer. At the summer solstice, June 21 or 22, the Sun’s rays hit the Earth most directly along the Tropic of Cancer (23.5 degrees N); that is, the angle of incidence of the sun’s rays there is zero (the angle of incidence is the deviation in the angle of an incoming ray amazon card login synchrony bank straight on). When it is summer solstice in the Northern Hemisphere, it is winter solstice in the Southern Hemisphere.

NORTHERN HEMISPHERE WINTER
Winter solstice for the Northern Hemisphere happens on December 21 or 22. The tilt of Earth’s axis points away from the Sun. Light from the Sun is spread out over a larger area, so that area isn’t heated as much. With fewer daylight hours in winter, there is also less time for the Sun to warm the area. When it is winter in the Northern Hemisphere, it is summer in the Southern Hemisphere.

EQUINOX
Sun rises in the east and sets in the west between the two solstices, the Sun’s rays shine most directly at the equator, called an “equinox.” The daylight and nighttime hours are exactly equal on an equinox. The autumnal equinox happens on September 22 or 23 and the vernal or spring equinox happens March 21 or 22 in the Northern Hemisphere.

Solar Eclipses

 

solar eclipse occurs when the new moon passes directly between the Earth and the Sun (Figure 24.23). This casts a shadow on the Earth and blocks our view of the Sun. A total solar eclipse occurs when the Moon’s shadow completely blocks the Sun (Figure 24.24). When only a portion of the Sun is out of view, it is called a partial solar eclipse. Solar eclipses are rare events that usually only last a few minutes. That is because the Moon’s shadow only covers a very small area on Earth and Earth is turning very rapidly. As the Sun is covered by the moon’s shadow, it will actually get cooler outside. Birds may begin to sing, and stars will become visible in the sky. During a solar eclipse, the corona and solar prominences can be seen.

 

 

 

Figure 24.23: A solar eclipse.

 

Figure 24.24: Photo of a total solar eclipse. The corona is the white region surrounding the Sun.

A Lunar Eclipse

lunar eclipse occurs when the full moon moves through the shadow of the Earth (Figure 24.25). This can only happen when the Earth is between the Moon and the Sun and all three are lined up in the same plane, called the ecliptic. The ecliptic is the plane of Earth’s orbit around the Sun. The Earth’s shadow has two distinct parts: the umbra and the penumbra. The umbra is the inner, cone shaped part of the shadow, in which all of the light has been blocked. The outer part of Earth’s shadow is the penumbra where only part of the light is blocked. In the penumbra, the light is dimmed but not totally absent. A total lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon travels completely in Earth’s umbra. During a partial lunar eclipse, only a portion of the Moon enters Earth’s umbra. A penumbral eclipse happens when the Moon passes through Earth’s penumbra. The Earth’s shadow is quite large, so a lunar eclipse lasts for hours and can be seen by anyone with a view of the Moon at the time of the eclipse.

Figure 24.25: The formation of a lunar eclipse.

Partial lunar eclipses occur at least twice a year, but total lunar eclipses are less common. The next total lunar eclipse will occur December 21, 2010. The moon glows with a dull red coloring during a total lunar eclipse.

The Phases of the Moon

The Moon does not produce any light of its nsb bot discount code only reflects light from the Sun. As the Moon moves around the Earth, we see different parts of the near side of the Moon illuminated by the Sun. This causes the changes in the shape of the Moon that we notice on a regular basis, called the phases of the Moon. As the Moon revolves around Earth, the illuminated portion of the near side of the Moon will change from fully lit to completely dark and back again.

A full moon is the lunar phase seen when the whole of the Moon’s lit side is facing Earth. This phase happens when Earth is between the Moon and the Sun. About one week later, the Moon enters the quarter-moon phase. At this point, the Moon appears as a half-circle, since only half of the Moon’s lit surface is visible from Earth. When the Moon moves between Earth and the Sun, the side facing Earth is completely dark. This is called the new moon phase, and we do not usually see the Moon at this point. Sometimes you can just barely make out the outline of the new moon in the sky. This is because some sunlight reflects off the Earth and hits the moon. Before and after the quarter-moon phases are the gibbous and crescent phases. During the gibbous moon phase, the moon is more than half lit but not full. During the crescent moon phase, the moon is less than half lit and is seen as only a sliver or crescent shape. It takes about 29.5 days for the Moon to revolve around Earth and go through all the phases (Figure 24.26).

Figure 24.26: The phases of the Moon. Note that the Sun would be above the top of this picture, and thus, the Sun’s rays would be directed downward.

The Tides

Tides are the regular rising and falling of Earth’s surface water in response to gravitational attraction from the Moon and Sun. The Moon’s gravity causes the oceans to bulge out in the direction of the Moon. In other words, the Moon’s gravity is pulling upwards on Earth’s water, producing a high tide. On the other side of the Earth, there is another high tide area, produced where the Moon’s pull is weakest. As the Earth rotates on its axis, the areas directly in line with the Moon will experience high tides. Each place on Earth experiences changes in the height of the water throughout the day as it changes from high tide to low tide. There are two high tides and two low tides each tidal day. Figure 24.27 and Figure 24.28 will help you better understand how tides work.

Figure 24.27: A spring 5th third bank customer service phone number src="https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/candimgs/OABVJC/300px-Neaptide.jpg" alt="" width="300" height="300">

Figure 24.28: A neap tide.

The first picture shows what is called a spring tide. Confusingly, this tide has nothing to do with the season “Spring”, but means that the tide waters seem to spring forth. During a spring tide, the Sun and Moon are in line. This happens at both the new moon and the full moon. The Sun’s gravity pulls on Earth’s water, while the Moon’s gravity pulls on the water in the same places. The high tide produced by Sun adds to the high tide produced by the Moon. So spring tides have higher than normal high tides. This water is shown on the picture as the gray bulges on opposite sides of the Earth. Notice that perpendicular to the gray areas, the water is at a relatively low level. The places where the water is being pulled out experience high tides, while the areas perpendicular to them experience low tides. Since the Earth is rotating on its axis, the high-low tide cycle moves around the globe in a 24-hour period.

The second picture shows a neap tide. A neap tide occurs when the Earth and Sun are in line but the Moon is perpendicular to the Earth. This happens when the moon is at first or last quarter moon phase. In this case, the pull of gravity from the Sun partially cancels out the pull of gravity from the Moon, and the tides are less pronounced. Neap tides produce less extreme tides than the normal tides. This is because the high tide produced by the Sun adds to the low tide area of the Moon and vice versa. So high tide is not as high and low tide is not as low as it usually might be.

Lesson Summary

  • As the Earth rotates on its axis and revolves around the Sun, several different effects are produced.
  • When the new moon comes between the Earth and the Sun along the ecliptic, a solar eclipse is produced.
  • When the Earth comes between the full moon and the Sun along the ecliptic, a lunar eclipse occurs.
  • Observing the Moon from Earth, we see a sequence of phases as the side facing us goes from completely darkened to completely illuminated and back again once every 29.5 days.
  • Also as the Moon orbits Earth, it produces tides aligned with the gravitational pull of the Moon.
  • The Sun also produces a smaller solar tide. When the solar and lunar tide align, at new and full moons, we experience higher than normal tidal ranges, called spring tides.
  • At first and last quarter moons, the solar tide and lunar tide interfere with each other, producing lower than normal tidal ranges called neap tides.

Review Questions

  1. The globe is divided into time zones, so that any given hour of the day in one time zone occurs at a different time in other time zones. For example, New York City is in one time zone and Los Angeles is in another time zone. When it is 8 am in New York City, it is only 5 am in Midwest bank near me Angeles. Explain how Earth’s motions cause this difference in times.
  2. Explain how Earth’s tilt on its axis accounts for seasons on Earth.
  3. Explain how the positions of the Earth, Moon, and Sun vary during a solar eclipse and a lunar eclipse.
  4. Draw a picture that shows how the Earth, Moon, and Sun are lined up during the new moon phase.
  5. Why are neap tides less extreme than spring tides?

Vocabulary

crescent
Phase of the moon when it is less than half full but still slightly lit.
gibbous
Phase of the moon when it is more than half lit but not completely full.
lunar eclipse
An eclipse that occurs when the Sun rises in the east and sets in the west moves through the shadow of the Earth and is blocked from view.
neap tide
Type of tide event when the Sun and Earth are in line and the Moon is perpendicular to the Earth.
penumbra
Outer part of shadow that remains partially lit during an eclipse.
solar eclipse
Occurs when moon passes directly between the Earth and Sun; the Moon’s shadow blocks the Sun from view.
spring tide
An extreme tide event that happens when the Earth, Moon, and the Sun are aligned; happens at full and new moon phases.
tide
The regular rising and falling of Earth’s surface waters twice a tidal day as a result of the Moon’s and Sun’s gravitational attraction.
umbra
Inner cone shaped part of a shadow when all light is blocked during an eclipse.

Points to Consider

  • Why don’t eclipses occur every single month at the full and new moons?
  • The planet Mars has a tilt that is very similar to Earth’s. What does this produce on Mars?
  • Venus comes between the Earth and the Sun. Why don’t we see an eclipse when this happens?
Источник: https://courses.lumenlearning.com/earthscience/chapter/the-sun-and-the-earth-moon-system/

Why Does the Sun "Rise" and "Set"?
Exploring the Earth's Daily Cycle

As the Earth rotates, different locations on Earth pass through the sun's light. The animation shows how that looks hour by hour (for 4 hours). As your town turns toward the sun and begins to enter its light, the sun seems to rise in the east. As your town begins to leave the sun's light and enter darkness, it appears to set in the west.

Try this!
Shine a flashlight on the side of a ball and rotate the ball counterclockwise. (You can figure out which way to turn it by looking down on the ball from above and thinking of a clock face.) Watch what happens to the light and dark areas as the ball turns. This is what happens on the earth as it rotates toward the east (counterclockwise).

Back to Beginning

Источник: https://journeynorth.org/tm/mclass/SunriseSetAns.html
sun rises in the east and sets in the west

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