louis edmonds surgery

TAMPA, Fla. — The way Mariano Rivera sees it, the New York Yankees won't be looking for a closer for quite a while. In 1993, Louis Edmonds underwent successful treatment for throat cancer, entering retirement soon afterwards. Thereafter he continued to. Dr. Rick Lehman is a board certified Orthopedic Surgeon in St. Louis, MO that is Dr. Lehman joined an All-Star cast including Bob Costas, Jim Edmonds. louis edmonds surgery

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Twenty years ago today, the Los Angeles Angels traded gold glover Jim Edmonds to the St. Louis Cardinals for Kent Bottenfield and Adam Kennedy.

One of the most difficult seasons for Angels fans to watch from afar was Jim Edmonds 2000 campaign with the St. Louis Cardinals. Having spent the majority of his final season in Anaheim recovering from torn ligaments in a shoulder that had chronic symptoms which were ignored until the week before the season began, Edmonds first go-around with the Red Birds turned into an MVP-caliber performance.

The center fielder, who was traded to St. Louis twenty years ago today, had his most productive season to date in home runs (42), RBIs (108), runs scored (129), on-base percentage (.411), and slugging percentage (.583) during his first year wearing a different shade of red.

After endless trade rumors, louis edmonds surgery many insiders sending him to the Yankees countless times over the winter, Edmonds was finally moved to St. Louis less than two weeks before the start of the 2000 season. Although General Manager Bill Stoneman told Edmonds he was no longer being shopped, the trade came as no surprise to anyone reading the tea leaves, as Edmonds was set to become a free agent the following summer.

In return, the Halos received 18-game winner Kent Bottenfield and second base prospect Adam Kennedy.

Twenty years later, it’s hard not to look back at everything Jim Edmonds accomplished after leaving Anaheim, and wonder what if the trade had never happened? What if the local kid ended up staying home? Perhaps wishful thinking, but there’s no way to ignore the lopsided results that followed.

Edmonds was a three-time All-Star in St. Louis, who continued to dazzle fans with his defensive prowess, winning six more Gold Gloves, a Silver Slugger Award in 2004, and World Series championship in 2006.

Meanwhile, Kent Bottenfield proved his 18-7 record from the season before was a mirage. The veteran starter pitched to a dismal 7-8 record with a 5.71 ERA before the Halos traded him four months after acquiring him in a deadline-week deal for slugger Ron Gant.

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For fans, persistent rumors that Edmonds was disliked in the Angels clubhouse are often lost in review of his resume on the field. He was consistent, put his body on the line to catch damn near everything that was hit his way, and before opting for surgery in 1999, he was part of an Angels rebuild that was playing the franchise’s most exciting baseball since the mid-eighties.

While Bottenfield was a complete bust, Adam Kennedy tried his best to salvage value from the Edmonds deal. The Riverside native developed into a pretty good second baseman, his best season coming in 2002, when he hit .312/.345/.449, and won the ALCS MVP; his Game 5 heroics is arguably the best postseason performance in Angels history (next to Tim Salmon in Game 2 of the World Series). Kennedy hit three home runs on that day, helping the Angels advance to their first World Series in franchise history.

Sometimes trades can work out for both teams—after all, the Angels finally won their elusive championship a few years after dealing Edmonds with Kennedy playing a crucial role. But if you talk to Cardinals fans, they will never forget this trade as the one that helped set their franchise on a prolonged run of success, which included six postseason appearances, five National League Championship series, two World Series, and their own championship in 2006.

Next. Angels add Ryan Buchter to 40-man roster

Edmonds might have (probably would have?) walked after the 2000 season, the Angels might have never found the intricate piece Kennedy became as part of that 2002 team, and keeping Edmonds might have worked out worse than trading him. Twenty years later, it’s hard to woori america bank routing number nj what chain reactions would have happened had Edmonds remained in Anaheim.

In the end, the Angels got their championship, Edmonds turned into a Cardinals Hall-of-Famer, and we are left still talking about this deal today.

Источник: https://halohangout.com/2020/03/23/la-angels-the-jim-edmonds-trade-20-years-later/

He's No Angel

The duffel bag was big and dark blue, an official Major League Baseball model with an Anaheim Angels logo on the side. As Jim Edmonds held it for the final time, about to drop it into a garbage can in the St. Louis Cardinals' spring training clubhouse, utility infielder Shawon Dunston--thrifty if not sentimental--shouted, "Jim! What are you doing? You should save it."

Edmonds paused for a moment, turned his head toward Dunston and smiled. He then dropped the bag and walked back to his locker, where a brand-new, bright-red Cardinals duffel was already in place, one with Edmonds's number 15 on it. "Hell," he said, "I ain't saving that crap."

First days at the office are generally easy--lots of gladtameetcha's i m in a hurry to get things done directions to the coffee machine. It wasn't any different for Edmonds last Saturday, two days after St. Louis acquired the two-time Gold Glove centerfielder from Anaheim for righthanded starter Kent Bottenfield and second baseman Adam Kennedy. Edmonds handled everything smoothly, from a 20-minute tete-a-tete with Mark McGwire ("You'll like it here," said Big Mac. "We've only got one beat writer") to his initial encounters with the media (said Edmonds, repeatedly, "I'm just happy to be here") to his first hit as a Cardinal (a second-inning RBI single to left off the Baltimore Orioles' Calvin Maduro). All that was easy; the hard part will be overcoming the hellish reputation that has dogged him for years. A friendly .300-hitting slugger who signs autographs, produces in the clutch, is accessible to the press, hates to lose.and may be the most unpopular player in the game.

Baseball is a tight community. So tight that shortly after the trade was announced, several St. Louis players approached Mike James, the Cards' reliever and a former Angel, to inquire about their newest teammate. This wasn't an "Is he a gin rummy or dominoes guy?" inquiry. "They wanted to know if all the garbage that's been said about Louis edmonds surgery is for real," says James, one of Edmonds's closest friends. "Probably everyone in [this clubhouse] has heard the stuff--that he doesn't play hard, that he's a showoff, that he's not a team player. I told them the truth, that 99 percent of it is totally false."

And the other 1%?

"Nobody," says James, "is perfect."

Edmonds isn't quite sure when his evil reputation began to take shape. Maybe it goes back to the minors, when, despite being a hot five-tool prospect, small-town newspaper columnists took swipes at him: Doesn't try hard enough. Showboat. Loafer. Maybe it was when he was a rookie, in 1993, when veteran Angels mocked Edmonds (mostly behind his back) for his cocky demeanor. Maybe it was his third season when, during a pregame workout, he was embarrassed by a prank former teammates still cackle over (which says more about them than about him). One day earlier Edmonds had made a dazzling catch to save a run and then milked the moment by rolling around on the turf, mitt raised triumphantly. The next day, as Edmonds was stretching on the field, teammate Tony Phillips approached him from behind and placed a ketchup-splattered napkin, made to look like a sanitary napkin, under his legs. "Who's the pretty boy!" Phillips shouted as teammates roared with laughter.

"No question, Jim sometimes has a problem with body language and image," says San Diego Padres third baseman Phil Nevin, Edmonds's friend and Angels teammate in 1998. "People interpret him as being conceited, and it's not the case." Edmonds usually wears his cap backward during workouts, louis edmonds surgery he runs with a smooth, easy stride. "When I first got to Anaheim," says Nevin, "everyone told me I'd hate Jim because I'm such a hard-nosed guy who cares about winning. Jim is confident, and he has his own way, but he wants to win, too."

That's not always obvious to all his teammates. Two years ago, after the American League West-leading Angels surrendered a four-game lead over the Texas Rangers with a month left in the season, several teammates were furious because of Edmonds's nonchalance. "Jim smiles a lot and is outgoing," shortstop Gary DiSarcina told the Los Angeles Times. "That's his persona. But you can't act like that when you're on the verge of elimination. You can't bounce into the clubhouse without a care in the world when your teammates are bloodied, ticked off and not wanting to go home." That September, as Edmonds batted .340 with five home runs and 20 RBIs, DiSarcina hit .241 with no homers and five RBIs. "What matters is what you do on the field," says Edmonds. "If we're mathematically out of it on Aug. 1, I'm not going to come in the next day and want to kill myself. If you treat it like that, that's when you have a problem playing the game."

Last spring training was the worst for Edmonds. For three years he had played with a sore right shoulder, but he says that while there was pain from time to time, it was never bad enough to consider an operation. Then, three days before the season began, Edmonds was bench-pressing in the Edison Field weight room when--pop!--he tore the labrum in his right shoulder. "I was devastated," says Edmonds, who has been on the disabled list four times in his career. "I felt I was letting the team down." Shortly after the injury, when Edmonds learned that he needed surgery and would miss at least four months, he told the Times's Mike DiGiovanna that his shoulder had been bothering him for several years. When DiGiovanna put that in his story, some Angels fumed. First baseman Mo Vaughn tore into Edmonds, saying, "Jim Edmonds is one of the most talented guys I've ever played with. The responsibility is what's in question."

Edmonds was hurt and furious. On April 20, while the Angels were in Toronto, he telephoned the SkyDome press box from his home in California. He asked for DiGiovanna, chewed out the writer and then threatened him, saying, "I'll kick your ass!"

Several Angels, including Vaughn, now concede that they didn't fully understand Edmonds's situation, that they mistakenly thought that he had louis edmonds surgery put off surgery. "Nothing," says Edmonds, "could be further from the truth."

Edmonds missed all but 55 games last season, batting .250 with five home runs. He came back on Aug. 2, when the Angels were 17 1/2 games out and in last place, even though Edmonds says team doctors told him not to return if the Angels were out of contention. "I felt like I had to test it out and see what I could do," says Edmonds. "I owed it to the team."

This off-season Edmonds tried to ignore the machine-gun fire of trade rumors that, until last week, had laid siege to his life. Edmonds was raised in Diamond Bar, Calif., just an hour's drive from Anaheim. Playing for the Angels, he says, was a dream. "I gave my all to that team, whether people believe it or not," says Edmonds, who has hit .290 with 121 home runs and 408 RBIs in seven seasons. "I've never known why they tried so hard to get rid of me." One minute he was going to the Oakland A's, the next to the New York Yankees. Or the Colorado Rockies. Or the New York Mets. The low point came in early February, when numerous media outlets reported that Edmonds was headed to the Seattle Mariners as part of a three-way trade that would have sent Ken Griffey Jr. to the Cincinnati Reds. When the "deal" never occurred--says Anaheim general manager Bill Stoneman, "We were never involved in [discussions about] a three-way deal with Seattle and Cincinnati"--and Griffey was traded to the Reds for centerfielder Mike Cameron and three others, reporters wrote that Edmonds had refused to play for the Mariners. "I swear to god, I never said anything like that," says Edmonds, who is making $4.7 million in the last season of a five-year contract. "The only thing I ever said was, I don't want to make a decision about signing a long-term contract right now. I've played three games at Safeco Field. How could I make a decision? Hell, I hadn't even been traded."

Edmonds, a slow talker, has picked up the pace. His blue eyes become angry slits. Four lines crease his forehead. "I've heard everything I was supposed to have said--that I was afraid to replace Griffey, that I don't want to play there because the ball won't carry." Edmonds glances louis edmonds surgery a clubhouse table, where a copy of Baseball America rests. In an issue published after the Griffey trade, columnist Peter Gammons wrote that the Mariners may have been more interested in obtaining Angels outfielder Garret Anderson than Edmonds because Edmonds "continues to insist that he won't sign a long-term contract in Seattle because it's cold and damp."

"I never in my life have said that," says Edmonds, who--in the pursuit of a peaceful winter--declined all interview requests in the off-season. "For Gammons to print that and not ever talk to me is just totally ridiculous. That's the hardest thing to take. Once a rumor gets rolling, it seems like it's a snowball. It makes it easier for other people to say stuff." (Gammons, who admits he did not call Edmonds, says, "I think Jim is a good player. But Jim probably knows that [former teammates] Gary DiSarcina and Darin Erstad don't like him, and he probably thinks that I'm siding with them.")

There was no player more in need of a fresh start than Edmonds, which is why, shortly after Stoneman told him of the trade last Thursday, Edmonds began weeping. That outburst was fueled by several emotions, including the joy of a new start and the sorrow of impending separation. He left the Angels' spring training complex a short time later, then returned early the next morning to bid farewell to Anderson, his closest friend. As the two hugged, Edmonds again cried. When he joined the Cards on Saturday, his eyes still red, he began to speak of Angels rightfielder Tim Salmon, who had strongly defended him on Thursday, saying he was such a natural talent that people incorrectly assumed he wasn't playing hard. "I appreciated that so much," said Edmonds, taking deep breaths, trying to stay composed. "For Tim to speak up for me.god, I haven't been this emotional in a long time." Edmonds began to bend the rim of his new red cap. "I just hope to fit in here, show that I can help us win."

Minutes later he was in manager Tony La Russa's office, being told, essentially, that the past is the past and reputations mean nothing. As soon as the deal was concluded, La Russa moved centerfielder J.D. Drew to right and placed Eric Davis (still recovering from off-season shoulder surgery) on the bench to make way for Edmonds in center. Unwanted on a team that will most likely finish in the American League West cellar, Edmonds is suddenly a key component in one of the more potent lineups in baseball. He is, at last, wanted.

"I don't know Jim much," says Cardinals leftfielder Ray Lankford, "but I'll tell you this: If he's the player everyone says he is, and he hustles and works his butt off, nobody will care what they said about him in Anaheim. That's old news. He's not an Angel anymore. This is a new day. Jim's a Cardinal."

Источник: https://vault.si.com

Five questions: St. Louis Cardinals

Just a couple of weeks before spring training, the Cardinals lost both Adam Wainwright and Jim Edmonds to season- and career-ending injuries, respectively. I’m not usually one to bitch about that kind of stuff, but the combination of losing both of those franchise icons in such a short span was a real punch in the gut.

The Edmonds injury, or rather the announcement that his past injuries had left him unable to continue his career, was more of an emotional blow, given that the man was 40 and hadn’t played for the Cardinals since 2007*. He was going to be a pinch hitter, at best, and the primary purpose of signing him was likely to insure that he would retire a Cardinal.

*Interestingly, Edmonds has played for the Cubs, the Brewers and the Reds since leaving the Cardinals—each of those teams is in the Cardinals’ division and are their biggest rivals this year.

However, Edmonds has obviously been one of the franchise’s all-time greats and does still possess a sweet left-handed swing, so I was very excited about seeing him play next year. Objectively, however, his departure does not hurt the team much. Adam Wainwright’s injury, on the other hand, was a much bigger blow, and the effect it will have on the 2011 Cardinals is somewhat staggering.

Anyway, those losses capped off a rather tumultuous offseason that, unfortunately, left the Cards in a far worse position than when they started. The first sign of bad things to come was the extension of Tony La Russa, who in his prime may have been a great manager, but whose habits now resemble that of your grandpa at the old folks home—including the irrational dislike of many dang kids.

One such dang kid was Brendan Ryan, who was coming off a relatively poor season in which his Smithian glove didn’t quite make up for his pre-prime-Smithian bat. Still, he otherwise would have been a solid option at shortstop going forward. However, Ryan apparently did not get along well with many of his teammates and, perhaps more importantly, did not get get along with his manager.

Thus, it was deemed prudent to trade him away for some A-ball filler and trade for Ryan Theriot. Although the downgrade from Ryan to Theriot was not quite proportional to the negative reaction from the commentariat, the former—oft known as Boog—was a fan favorite and an exciting player to watch, while Theriot is just flat out boring. At the very least, the trade seemed reactionary and overly political.

Mixed in with that sordid affair were two very good moves, the first being a below-market extension of Jake Westbrook, and the second being a below-market signing of Lance Berkman. I was particularly exuberant about the Berkman signing and waged a fine war against internet detractors, and the Jake Westbrook signing was extremely necessary (even more so now) given the lack of depth in the Cardinals rotation.

The first couple months of the offseason, however, merely set the stage for what would be perhaps the biggest story of the offseason: Albert Pujols’ extension deadline.

In case you’ve been living under a rock, or have been smart enough not to pay much attention to national sports coverage, you’ll note that Pujols—a Cardinal of ten years and currently the best player in baseball—will become a free agent after the 2011 season, and he gave the Cardinals up until spring training of this year to work out an extension. They did not work out a deal and, according to Jon Heyman and his league of anonymous sources, were never particularly close.

As Cubs fans rejoiced in the streets for some reason, we Cardinals fans soon realized and accepted that Pujols was not going to sign a 10-year, $180 million contract. The gods of baseball work in mysterious ways, however, and after a brief rejuvenation of spirits at the signing of Edmonds, Cards fans were hit with the aforementioned gut punches.

The silver lining in all of this is there are now a whole host of questions regarding the state of the 2011 Cardinals, which makes my job easier. Let’s start with the big one…

How much will Wainwright’s injury cost the Cardinals?

Most people know Wainwright as the guy who made Carlos Beltran look like a jackass in the ninth inning of Game Seve of the 2006 NLCS. Or perhaps they know him as the man who has pitched over 460 innings over the past two years with an ERA just over 2.50. Regardless, everyone knows Wainwright is one of the top-tier pitchers in baseball.

So, like I said earlier, the loss of that pitcher for an entire season will likely have a staggering effect on the Cardinal’s performance. Just how much is open for debate. The Hardball Times’ Oliver projection system gave Wainwright a louis edmonds surgery of 210 innings pitched and a 3.12 ERA—good for 5.4 wins above replacement. That seems like a reasonable expectation given his recent performance. The wild card is how well his replacement will do.

That replacement appears to be Kyle McClellan who has ostensibly been a candidate for the rotation for years now. However, this year the job finally seems to be his. McClellan, being a reliever with a full repertoire of under-powering stuff, has pitched exactly as well you’d expect. Low walk totals, low strikeout totals, and a slight propensity for inducing ground balls.

A Hardball Times Update

by RJ McDaniel

Goodbye for now.

While his louis edmonds surgery ERA is in the low threes, his career FIP is right at 4.00, and given his short career, his FIP is likely more indicative of how well he has pitched so far. So you’ve got a slightly-above-average reliever in the middle of his prime. According to my calculations, he should be a below-average starter, perhaps putting up somewhere around a 4.60 ERA.

Of course, the transition from the pen to the rotation can have a different effect on each pitcher, and McClellen could very well do much better or worse than that projection. While I am loath to reference spring training statistics in any meaningful way, he has been fantastic so far. Regardless, a 4.60 ERA over 150 innings translates to around 0.5 wins above replacement, which would mean the Cardinals will be expected to lose around five games to Wainwright’s injury.

If McClellan should fail, next in his place would either be Miguel Batista or Lance Lynn. I often have nightmares about what would happen should Batista join the rotation, usually ending with the world collapsing into hell, and me waking up on the ground in the fetal position; however, Lynn is a very suitable option—a young-ish prospect who can throw hard how to find bank routing number chase has some upside. He was just sent down to the minors but could very well be in the big leagues in short order.

How much will Berkman contribute?

When the Cardinals first signed Lance Berkman, I was ecstatic. This was the former Cardinal killer, the man with a career .409 OBP and one of the few players who has been able to consistently perform at an All-Star level over the past decade.

He is coming his worst season ever, but it still saw him put up a .368 OBP and perform at roughly a league-average level. Berkman seems like a pretty good bet to rebound from his poor season, however, and I would expect him to return to 2009 form, with an OPS around .900. Indeed, Oliver projects an .847 OPS.

The biggest issue is not his hitting, but rather his fielding. With first base not really a position of need for the Cardinals, Berkman had to move from his customary position to right field. Although he has played in the outfield before, and according to defensive statistics, played reasonably well, Berkman’s getting old and has been injured a lot recently. Still, the corner outfield recently has been littered with the statues of Adam Dunn, Raul Ibanez and Brad Hawpe, and Berkman probably could manage to be within 10 runs of an average defensive outfielder.

An ~.850 OPS paired with -10 run defense in the corner outfield would make Berkman roughly a 1.6 WAR player over 150 games. That number gels nicely with the one-year, $8 million contract he got from St. Louis.

However, that 1.6 WAR median projection ignores the obvious and massive upside that a former MVP-caliber player such as Berkman has. It was only in 2008 that he was a 7.0 WAR player. So I personally think the signing was a very nice move and am excited to see if he can return to form, and also to see what a Rasmus-Pujols-Holliday-Berkman middle of the order might do.

Just how bad will the middle infield be?

Cards fans have been blessed with many things: arguably the best player in the game, a playoff appearance nearly every year this decade and a World Series title in 2006. However, over the past few years the middle infield has been a source of anguish for the fans. Only in 2009, when Ryan and Skip Schumaker combined to provide roughly average production at SS and 2B, respectively, did the Cardinals middle infield approach competency.

Last year the same two were each terrible, providing overall production only slightly above replacement level. Ryan couldn’t hit worth a lick, and Schumaker’s hitting and fielding both fell precipitously. To compound that dire situation, the front office decided to trade away the better of the two players—Brendan Ryan being younger, cheaper, and better over his career—for reasons relating to his personal interactions with teammates and coaching.

You might be able to gauge my opinion of the trade. While Ryan may have been seen as “spacy” and “undisciplined,” anyone who has ever heard him speak could tell that he is in no way, shape or form a clubhouse cancer, and it would be very hard to argue that his personality would have a significant negative effect on teammates. Indeed, the Cardinals traded away a productive and cheap starter for asinine reasons.

The man they got to replace Ryan was Theriot, who is simply not a very good player. A couple of years ago he was able to provide solid defense and a good OBP, making him a relatively valuable player. But 2010 happened and Theriot saw his offense plummet, and much of his defensive value was lost when he was moved off shortstop (although that was probably in deference to Rafael Furcal).

I’m not sure how well Theriot will do this year, and he could very well return to 2009 form; however, he is now well past his prime and even at his best was reliant on a high BABIP. Schumaker profiles similarly to Theriot—a far worse fielder, but also likely a better hitter with a bit more power. Like Theriot, Schumaker was one of the worst players in baseball in 2010 and average-ish before then.

I don’t have much hope for either and would be pleased with anything above replacement-level performances.

How will Jaime Garcia do in his second season?

A bright spot for the Cardinals last year amidst the piles of Miles’ and Feliz’s and Lohse’s ineptitude was the amazing performance of rookie starting pitcher Jaime Garcia. A lefty with a full arsenal of moving stuff, Garcia impressed with an above-average strikeout rate and worm killing tendencies. His 3.41 FIP was fantastic, and though he was blessed with a favorable home run rate, his xFIP (which adjusts for aberrant home run rates) was only a few points higher. And this was his first full year back from Tommy John surgery.

Suffice to say, Garcia has a bunch of potential going into 2011, and I personally am very excited to see what he can do. The biggest area of improvement he can make is with his command. His walk rate was slightly worse than league average, and his strikeout rate was note quite as good as you’d expect given the quality of his stuff. I suspect a lot of this has to do with the ridiculous amounts of movement he gets on his pitches, acting as a blessing and a curse. Should he be able to control that movement better, I think he could be one of the best pitchers in baseball this season.

Something something Pujols something

And finally we arrive at perhaps the biggest question going into 2011 for the Cardinals—how long will Ryan Franklin grow his beard out? Will he finally achieve the elusive foot-beard? I’m sure this is a question eating a hole inside the minds of many Cards fans and facial hair aficionados around the world, and the consequences of whatever the answer is will have an unmeasurable effect on the future of manki…

Ok, my editors are telling me that perhaps Pujols’ impending free agency is a bigger issue. As I mentioned earlier, Pujols was not signed to an extension this offseason and, thus, will become a free agent at the end of the 2011 season. This brings up two interesting questions. One is the obvious—will Pujols resign with the Cards, or go the the Angels or something?—and the second is perhaps more exciting—how well will Pujols hit in a contract year?

As to the first question, I have no idea. The Cardinals are a upper-tier team in terms of revenue and, as such, will be in a position to offer a sizable contract to Pujols. Furthermore, Pujols has strong ties to the St. Louis community, and it would be good for his legacy to remain with one team for his entire career. On the other hand, some other team will likely be able to offer more years and/or dollars than the Cardinals can afford.

Obviously, numerous factors will contribute to Pujols’ eventual choice. If the Cardinals make the playoffs this year, he may be more inclined to forgo a little extra dough to stay on a competitive team. If the Yankees decide they want to expand their payroll to $250 million and have a middle order of Pujols-Teixeira-ARod, Pujols might be tempted to leave the Cards. I have no idea. My manly intuition tells me Pujols will sign with the Cards for slightly less than what another team offers, but, that’s, uh, not really based on anything.

As to the second question, the answer gleaned from my cursory Google searchings appears to be “amazing” or, in other words, “about as well as he’s always hit.” The Cards front office themselves admitted that there was no evidence that a contract year boosts performance. And even if it does, it doesn’t really seem possible for Pujols to improve his performance much more.

So the noaa weather forecast bangor maine surrounding Pujols, while interesting, are met with somewhat unsatisfying answers. The only thing I know for sure is that Pujols will be a Cardinal for at least one more year, and regardless of what happens after this season, I am going to enjoy watching him hit in that fantastic middle of the order, and also some great pitching performances every couple of days.

Источник: https://tht.fangraphs.com/five-questions-st-louis-cardinals1/

louis edmonds surgery

PASSED AWAY: March 3, 2001. In 1999, Ms. Warrick told a fan club gathering that Mr. Edmonds planned to return to All My Children on a limited basis, but his compromised healthy never made that possible. Near the end of his life, Louis collaborated with New York-based author Craig Hamrick, on Louis' biography, Big Lou. New comedy series for Y&R, DAYS star Eileen Davidson, Marla Adams recounts her emotional journey as Y&R's Dina.

Find out what's ahead this week on Y&R.

Waiting for James Scott to reprise his role as E.J.?

He acted on the supernatural soap Dark Shadows as the cowardly, corrupt Roger Collins from 1966 to 1971. Find out what's ahead this week on DAYS, DAYS welcomes back Vanessa Williams as Dr. Valerie Grant. Ava proves to be her own worst enemy, General Hospital's Ingo Rademacher opens up about anger issues and parenting, General Hospital casts Gregory Harrison as Finn and Chase's dad, Gregory Chase, Steve Burton assures fans that he'll be on General Hospital for "a long time", General Hospital's Ricky Martin stirs up trouble in Jingle Jangle, a Netflix louis edmonds surgery musical, General Hospital's Mark Lawson experiences a cancer scare, urges fans to "stay soapy, stay safe", General Hospital's Ashton Arbab teases to "check under ur bed" as his film, A Babysitter's Guide to Monster Hunting, nears release, INTERVIEW: General Hospital's Nancy Lee Grahn says liberty savings bank online sign in osteoporosis story is NOT an "old lady" storyline, SURPRISE!

On the set, he was frail and could no longer loudly project his once-booming and lyrical voice, so the show's writers gradually gave him less and less to do. Along with cast mates, he even achieved immortality on a View-Master reel, a notable pop-culture accomplishment. His other roles on Dark Shadows were Joshua Collins (the father of Barnabas Collins), Edward Collins (the older brother of Quentin Collins), Roger Collins PT (Roger Collins' opposite self in 1970 Parallel Time), the adult Daniel Collins (a cousin of Barnabas Collins and Millicent Collins' younger brother), Amadeus Collins (a lawyer who was the main prosecutor in the trial of Judah Zachary in 1692, whose spirit later possesses Gerard Stiles in 1840), and Brutus Collins (a ghost who haunted the secret locked room in 1841 Parallel Time). [1], Learn how and when to remove this template message, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Louis_Edmonds&oldid=933039563, Disease-related deaths in New York (state), Articles needing additional references from March 2013, All articles needing additional references, Turner Classic Movies person ID same as Wikidata, Internet Off-Broadway Database person ID same as Wikidata, Wikipedia articles with SNAC-ID identifiers, Wikipedia articles with WORLDCATID identifiers, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 29 December 2019, at 17:08.

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Источник: louis edmonds surgery

St. Louis Cardinals Broadcasters

Jim Edmonds will enter his sixth season with the Cardinals television broadcast team serving as game analyst broadcasting select games alongside Dan McLaughlin on Bally Sports Midwest. Edmonds will also return for his ninth ge at the banks cincinnati as a studio analyst on the Cardinals Live pre-game and post-game shows.

An eight-time Gold Glove recipient and four-time All-Star, Edmonds was one of the best outfielders to play centerfield for the Cardinals. He was inducted into the Cardinals Hall of Fame in the inaugural year of the Hall opening in 2014. Edmonds played parts of 17 seasons in the Major Leagues with the Angels, Cardinals, Padres, Cubs, Brewers and Reds, and holds a career .284 batting average after playing in over 2,000 games. He ended his career just shy of 500 doubles (437), 400 homers (393) and 1,200 RBI (1,199). The bulk of Edmonds career was spent wearing a Cardinals uniform, as he played for eight seasons with St. Louis (2000-07), hitting .285 with 241 home runs and 713 RBI. He helped lead the team to six playoff appearances, including the 2006 World Series Championship, and in 2000 and 2004 finished in the top five in National League MVP voting.

The left-handed hitting Edmonds was known for his highlight reel catches, perhaps none bigger than his diving catch in Game 7 of the National League Championship Series vs. the Houston Astros at Busch Stadium in 2004. One night after Edmonds forced Game 7 with a 12th-inning, two-run, walk-off homer, he snared a line drive in the left-centerfield gap with a diving catch and his back to the plate.

Edmonds, 50, has seven children, daughters Lauren, Hayley, Sutton and Aspen, and sons Landon, Hayes and Hart.

Источник: https://www.mlb.com/cardinals/team/broadcasters

Louis edmonds surgery -

Pharmacists

Krisinder Singh (F) Full Time at Woodley site

Krisinder has recently joined our team. She plays a vital role in the team. She complement’s community pharmacists and other members of the PCN multi-disciplinary team. As a Clinical Pharmacists she works as part of the general practice team to  resolve day-to-day medicine issues and consult with and treat patients directly. This includes providing extra help to manage long-term conditions, advice for those on multiple medications and better access to health checks.

Physician Associates

Louise Edmunds – Physician Associate
(full time both sites)
After training with Dr Hussain we welcomed Louise into our Practice. She works cohesively with the clinicians and specialises in minor illnesses.

Physiotherapists

Mr Sundar Vaidyanathaswamy – Physiotherapist (Mondays – Woodley)

Mrs Poonam Kumari – Physiotherapist (Thursdays (Woodley)

We have 2 physios working at our sites each week. They are here as first point of contact for patients seeking an appointment for back pain, and other musculoskeletal conditions.

Care Coordinator

Lisa Pickering – Care Coordinator (Monday -Thursday, Woodley)

Lisa’s role is to coordinate key activity including patient access to services, advice and information, and ensuring health and care planning is timely, efficient, and patient-centred. This is so that our patients can receive the best possible care and service throughout their primary care patient journey.

Attached Staff

District Nurses

Health Visitors

A health visitor is a registered nurse who has received training particularly related to babies, children and pregnant women. Their role is to provide families with children under five years old with support and advice around the general aspects of mental, physical and social wellbeing.

Источник: https://www.parksidefamilypractice.nhs.uk/practice-information/healthcare-team/

St. Louis Cardinals Broadcasters

Jim Edmonds will enter his sixth season with the Cardinals television broadcast team serving as game analyst broadcasting select games alongside Dan McLaughlin on Bally Sports Midwest. Edmonds will also return for his ninth season as a studio analyst on the Cardinals Live pre-game and post-game shows.

An eight-time Gold Glove recipient and four-time All-Star, Edmonds was one of the best outfielders to play centerfield for the Cardinals. He was inducted into the Cardinals Hall of Fame in the inaugural year of the Hall opening in 2014. Edmonds played parts of 17 seasons in the Major Leagues with the Angels, Cardinals, Padres, Cubs, Brewers and Reds, and holds a career .284 batting average after playing in over 2,000 games. He ended his career just shy of 500 doubles (437), 400 homers (393) and 1,200 RBI (1,199). The bulk of Edmonds career was spent wearing a Cardinals uniform, as he played for eight seasons with St. Louis (2000-07), hitting .285 with 241 home runs and 713 RBI. He helped lead the team to six playoff appearances, including the 2006 World Series Championship, and in 2000 and 2004 finished in the top five in National League MVP voting.

The left-handed hitting Edmonds was known for his highlight reel catches, perhaps none bigger than his diving catch in Game 7 of the National League Championship Series vs. the Houston Astros at Busch Stadium in 2004. One night after Edmonds forced Game 7 with a 12th-inning, two-run, walk-off homer, he snared a line drive in the left-centerfield gap with a diving catch and his back to the plate.

Edmonds, 50, has seven children, daughters Lauren, Hayley, Sutton and Aspen, and sons Landon, Hayes and Hart.

Источник: https://www.mlb.com/cardinals/team/broadcasters

HSS Medical Staff

Please find below a directory of our physicians listed by department. If you wish to search for a physician by specialty and/or location, go to our Find a Doctor search form. If you would like help finding the right doctor for you, contact our Physician Referral Service at 877.606.1555.

Honorary Staff

Stephen W. Burke, MD - Orthopedic Surgery
Lawrence J. Kagen, MD - Medicine
David B. Levine, MD - Orthopedic Surgery
Chitranjan S. Ranawat, MD - Orthopedic Surgery
Peter Tsairis, MD - Neurology
Andrew J. Weiland - Orthopedic Surgery

Medical Staff

Department of Orthopedic Surgery

Orthopedic Surgeons Emeriti

Stanley E. Asnis, MD
Oheneba Boachie-Adjei, MD
Walther H. Bohne, MD
Stephen W. Burke, MD
Edward V. Craig, MD, MPH
Michael J. Errico, MD

Lewis B. Lane, MD
David B. Levine, MD
Peter J. Marchisello, MD
Richard R. McCormack, Jr., MD
Chitranjan S. Ranawat, MD
Andrew J. Weiland, MD

Attending Orthopedic Surgeons

Todd J. Albert, MD
Michael M. Alexiades, MD
Answorth A. Allen, MD
David W. Altchek, MD
Edward A. Athanasian, MD
Friedrich Boettner, MD
Mathias P. Bostrom, MD
Michelle G. Carlson, MD
Frank P. Cammisa, Jr., MD
Frank A. Cordasco, MD
Charles N. Cornell, MD
David M. Dines, MD
Joshua S. Dines, MD
Jonathan T. Deland, MD
Mark P. Figgie, MD
Federico P. Girardi, MD
Alejandro González Della Valle, MD
Daniel W. Green, MD
Steven B. Haas, MD
Jo A. Hannafin, MD, PhD
John H. Healey, MD
David L. Helfet, MD
Bryan T. Kelly, MD
Joseph M. Lane, MD

William J. Long, MD, FRCSC
John P. Lyden, MD
Steve K. Lee, MD
Robert G. Marx, MD
David J. Mayman, MD
Stephen J. O'Brien, MD
Douglas E. Padgett, MD
Andrew D. Pearle, MD
Amar S. Ranawat, MD
Bernard A. Rawlins, MD
William Ricci, MD
Scott A. Rodeo, MD
Jose A. Rodriguez, MD
S. Robert Rozbruch, MD
Eduardo A. Salvati, MD
Thomas P. Sculco, MD
Edwin P. Su, MD
Russell F. Warren, MD
Geoffrey H. Westrich, MD
Thomas L. Wickiewicz, MD
Roger F. Widmann, MD
Riley J. Williams, MD
Scott W. Wolfe, MD

Associate Attending Orthopedic Surgeons

John S. Blanco, MD
Robert L. Buly, MD
Struan H. Coleman, MD
Matthew E. Cunningham, MD, PhD
Aaron Daluiski, MD
Gregory S. DiFelice, MD
Emily R. Dodwell, MD
Shevaun M. Doyle, MD
Scott J. Ellis, MD
James C. Farmer, MD
Peter D. Fabricant, MD, MPH
Stephen Fealy, MD
Austin T. Fragomen, MD
Duretti T. Fufa, MD
Andreas H. Gomoll, MD
Lawrence V. Gulotta, MD
Robert N. Hotchkiss, MD
Russel C. Huang, MD
Alexander P. Hughes, MD

Anne M. Kelly, MD
Han Jo Kim, MD
Darren R. Lebl, M.D., F.A.A.O.S.
David S. Levine, MD
John D. MacGillivray, MD
Patrick F. O'Leary, MD
Martin J. O'Malley, MD
Daniel A. Osei, MD, MSc
Michael L. Parks, MD
Sheeraz Qureshi, MD
Anil S. Ranawat, MD
Matthew M. Roberts, MD
Andrew A. Sama, MD
Harvinder S. Sandhu, MD, MBA
David M. Scher, MD
Peter K. Sculco, MD
Beth E. Shubin Stein, MD
Ernest L. Sink, MD
Sabrina M. Strickland, MD
Karen M. Sutton, MD

Assistant Attending Orthopedic Surgeons

Scott W. Alpert, MD
David E. Asprinio, MD
Michael P. Ast, MD
Steve B. Behrens, MD
Theodore A. Blaine, MD
Jason L. Blevins, MD
Stephanie Swensen Buza, MD
Sean T. Campbell, MD
Alberto Carli, MD
Brian P. Chalmers, MD
Talia R. Chapman, MD
Elizabeth A. Cody, MD
Fred D. Cushner, MD
Constantine A. Demetracopoulos, MD
James E. Dowdell, III, MD
Mark C. Drakos, MD
Daniel R. Dziadosz, MD
Andrew J. Elliott, MD
Michael C. Fu, MD, MHS
Elizabeth B. Gausden, MD, MPH
Charles B. Goodwin, MD
Andrew W. Grose, MD
Derek G. Hansen, MD
Jessica H. Heyer, MD
Allan E. Inglis, Jr., MD

Sravisht Iyer, MD
Seth A. Jerabek, MD
Anne Holland Johnson, MD
Lana Kang, MD
Sariah Khormaee, MD, PhD
Alejandro Leali, MD
John C. L'Insalata, MD
Daniel Markowicz, MD
Steven J. McAnany, MD
Moira M. McCarthy, MD
Alexander S. McLawhorn, MD, MBA
Danyal H. Nawabi, MD
Benedict U. Nwachukwu, MD, MBA
Cathleen L. Raggio, MD
Taylor J. Reif, MD
Daniel S. Rich, MD
Howard Anthony Rose, MD
Ameya V. Save, MD
William W. Schairer, MD
Evan D. Sheha, MD
Mark F. Sherman, MD
Gbolabo Sokunbi, MD
Samuel A. Taylor, MD
Samir K. Trehan, MD
Jonathan M. Vigdorchik, MD
Kurt V. Voellmicke, MD
Steven B. Zelicof, MD, PhD

Ambulatory Care Center
Assistant Attending Physiatrist

David Hyams, MD

Associate Attending Surgeons

Gary A. Fantini, MD (Vascular Surgery)
Lloyd B. Gayle, MD (Plastic Surgery)

Assistant Attending Surgeons

Kenneth O. Rothaus, MD (Plastic Surgery)

Consulting Staff

Asheesh Bedi, MD (Hip Preservation)
Harvey Strauss, DPM (Podiatry)

Department of Medicine

Physician-in-Chief and Director

S. Louis Bridges, MD, PhD

Physicians-in-Chief Emeriti

Mary K. Crow, MD
Stephen A. Paget, MD

Physicians Emeriti

Harry Bienenstock, MD
Lawrence J. Kagen, MD
Bento R. Mascarenhas, MD
Irwin Nydick, MD
Martin Nydick, MD
Ernest Schwartz, MD
James P. Smith, MD
Mary Beth Walsh, MD

Attending Physicians

Anne R. Bass, MD
Richard S. Bockman, MD, PhD
(Endocrinology)
Barry D. Brause, MD
Vivian Bykerk, BSc, MD, FRCPC
Mary K. Crow, MD
Theodore R. Fields, MD (Rheumatology)
Allan Gibofsky, MD
Susan M. Goodman, MD
Lionel B. Ivashkiv, MD
Michael D. Lockshin, MD
Steven K. Magid, MD

Carol A. Mancuso, MD
Joseph A. Markenson, MD
Karen Brandt Onel, MD
(Chief, Pediatric Rheumatology)
Stephen A. Paget, MD
Francis Perrone, MD
(Cardiovascular Disease)
Jane E. Salmon, MD
Lisa R. Sammaritano, MD
Robert F. Spiera, MD

Associate Attending Physicians

Assistant Attending Physicians

Juliet Aizer, MD, MPH (Rheumatology)
Caroline A. Andrew, MD
Dalit Ashany, MD (Rheumatology)
Medha Barbhaiya, MD (Rheumatology)
Jennifer M. Berger, MD
Matthew L. Buchalter, MD
Trang M. Bui, MD
Natalie Burg, MD (Rheumatology)
James J. Calloway, MD (Perioperative)
Karmela K. Chan, MD (Rheumatology)
Helen H. Chung, MD
Gina DelGiudice, MD
Obinna D. Eneanya, MD
David R. Fernandez, MD (Rheumatology)
Veronica Garcia Fusco, MD (Perioperative)
Nilasha Ghosh, MD, MS (Rheumatology)
Jacobo Futran, MD
Katherine N. Haseltine, MD (Endocrinology)
Michael W. Henry, MD (Infectious Disease)
Miriam B. Hoffman, MD (Perioperative)
Wesley Hollomon, MD
Michael I. Jacobs, MD (Dermatology)
Abdulkader Kasabji, MD
Mary J. Kollakuzhiyil, MD
Lindsay S. Lally, MD (Rheumatology)
Geeta G. Laud, MD
Lawrence F. Levin, MD (Chief, Cardiovascular)

Alana B. Levine, MD (Rheumatology)
Sarah B. Lieber, MD, MS (Rheumatology)
Lisa A. Mandl, MD (Rheumatology)
Bella Mehta, MBBS, MS (Rheumatology)
Charis F. Meng, MD (Rheumatology)
Iris Y. Navarro-Millan, MD (Rheumatology)
Mitchell C. Nelson, MD
Dana E. Orange, MD
Nancy Pan, MD (Pediatrics)
Edward J. Parrish, MD (Rheumatology)
Elizabeth Schulman, MD (Rheumatology)
Kimberly Showalter, MD (Rheumatology)
Mili Shum, MD
Alana E. Sigmund, MD (Perioperative)
Jessica R. Starr, M.D (Endocrinology)
Sarah F. Taber, MD (Pediatric Rheumatology)
Ariel D. Teitel, MD
Dee Dee Wu, MD (Rheumatology)
Arthur M. Yee, MD, PhD (Rheumatology)
Christine M. Yu, MD
Florence Yu, MD
Weijia Yuan, MD (Rheumatology)
Jennie Yu, MD (Perioperative)

Physicians to Ambulatory Care Center

Alana C. Serota, MD

Consulting Staff
Michael S. Farber, MD
Thomas M. Novella, DPM
(Podiatric Medicine, Performing Arts Medicine (Dance))

Clinical Psychology

Pediatrics

Chief

Lisa S. Ipp, MD

Attending Pediatrician

Lisa S. Ipp, MD
Karen Brandt Onel (Chief, Pediatric Rheumatology)

Associate Attending Pediatricians

Alexa B. Adams, MD
Jessica G. Davis, MD (Genetics)
Jordan D. Metzl (Primary Sports Medicine)

Assistant Attending Pediatricians

Susan B. Bostwick, MD
Hyun Susan Cha, MD
Mary F. DiMaio, MD
Nancy Pan, MD
Stephanie L. Perlman, MD
Melanie C. Prior, MD

Primary Sports Medicine

Chief

John P. DiFiori, MD

Associate Attending Physicians

Lisa R. Callahan, MD
Brian C. Halpern, MD
Jordan D. Metzl, MD

Assistant Attending Physicians

William W. Briner Jr., MD
Sameer Dixit, MD
Marci A. Goolsby, MD
James J. Kinderknecht, MD
Osric S. King, MD
Ryan J. Lingor, MD
Kathryn McElheny, MD
Todd McGrath, MD
James N. Robinson, MD
Daphne A. Scott, MD
Nicholas Sgrignoli, MD
Brett G. Toresdahl, MD
David A. Wang, MD
Warren K. Young, MD

Psychiatry

Department of Anesthesiology, Critical Care & Pain Management

Anesthesiologist-in-Chief and Director

Gregory A. Liguori, MD

Anesthesiologist-in-Chief Emeritus

Nigel E. Sharrock, MB, ChB

Attending Anesthesiologists

Gregory A. Liguori, MD
Spencer S. Liu, MD
Stavros G. Memtsoudis, MD, PhD

Associate Attending Anesthesiologists

Assistant Attending Anesthesiologists

Lila R. Baaklini, MD
Jonathan C. Beathe, MD
James D. Beckman, MD
Devan D. Bhagat, MD
Mark A. Brouillette, MD
Bradford E. Carson, MD
Stephanie Cheng, MD
Kathryn (Kate) Delpizzo, MD (Director, Pediatric Anesthesia)
Christopher A. Di Meo, MD
Naomi Dong, MD
Chris R. Edmonds, MD
Michael R. Friedman, MD
Sean Garvin, MD
Michael A. Gordon, MD
Enrique A. Goytizolo, MD
Douglas S.T. Green, MD
Robert S. Griffin, MD, PhD (Pain Management)
Carrie R. Guheen, MD
Semih Gungor, MD (Pain Management)
Carlos N. Hernandez Torres, MD (Pain Management)
Michael C. Ho, MD
Genewoo J. Hong, MD
Joseph C. Hung, MD (Pain Management)
Richard L. Kahn, MD (Medical Director, Ambulatory Surgery)
Mandip S. Kalsi, MD
David H. Kim, MD
Sang Jo Kim, MD
Richard S. King, MD
Meghan A. Kirksey, MD, PhD
Kanupriya Kumar, MD

Vincent R. LaSala, MD
Andrew C. Lee, MD
Bradley H. Lee, MD
David L. Lee, MD
Yi Lin, MD
Jiabin Liu, MD
Daniel B. Maalouf, MD, MPH
Anuj Malhotra, MD (Pain Management)
John G. Muller, MD
Jemiel A. Nejim, MD
Joseph A. Oxendine, MD
Jean-Pierre Ouanes, MD
Swetha Pakala, MD
Leonardo Paroli, MD, PhD
Thomas J. Quinn, MD
Faye H. Rim, MD
Daniel I. Richman, MD (Pain Management)
Jordan M. Ruby, MD
Sadiah Siddiqui, MD (Pain Management)
Harmandeep Singh, MD (Pain Management)
Michael N. Singleton, MD
Ellen M. Soffin, MD
Lauren H. Turteltaub, MD
Philip J. Wagner, MD
Seth A. Waldman, MD (Director, Pain Management)
David Y. Wang, MD (Pain Management)
Pamela K. Wendel, MD
Douglas S. Wetmore, MD
Christopher Wu, MD
Elaine I. Yang, MD

Assistant Attending Physician (Non-Interventional Pain Medicine)

Christine J. Peterson, MD

Assistant Attending Neurologist (Pain Management)

Vladimir N. Kramskiy, MD

Department of Neurology

Neurologist-in-Chief and Director

Dale J. Lange, MD

Neurologist Emeritus

Peter Tsairis, MD

Attending Neurologists

Ronald G. Emerson, MD
Dale J. Lange, MD
Dexter Y. Sun, MD, PhD

Associate Attending Neurologist

Martin Goldstein, MD

Assistant Attending Neurologists

Bridget T. Carey, MD
Vladimir Kramskiy, MD
Dora K. Leung, MD
Erin E. Manning, MD
Pantelis P. Pavlakis, MD, PhD
Brion D. Reichler, MD
Teena Shetty, MD
Alexander Shtilbans, MD, PhD

Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine

Pathologist-in-Chief and Director

Thomas W. Bauer, MD

Attending Pathologists

Edward F. DiCarlo, MD
Michael J. Klein, MD

Associate Attending Pathologist

Scott Avecilla, MD, PhD
Roberto A. Garcia, MD
Yaxia Zhang, MD, PhD

Assistant Attending Pathologists

Daniel C. Ramirez, MD

Department of Physiatry

Physiatrist-in-Chief and Director

Joel M. Press, MD

Physiatrist-in-Chief Emeriti

Joseph H. Feinberg, MD
Gregory E. Lutz, MD

Attending Physiatrist

Joseph H. Feinberg, MD
Joel M. Press, MD
Heidi Prather, DO

Associate Attending Physiatrist

Ellen K. Casey, MD
Jonathan S. Kirschner, MD
Gregory E. Lutz, MD
Peter J. Moley, MD
James F. Wyss, MD, PT

Assistant Attending Physiatrists

Dena Barsoum, MD
Naimish Baxi, MD
Daniel H. Blatz. MD
Vincenzo Castellano, MD
Alice Chen, MD
Jesse N. Charnoff, MD
Paul M. Cooke, MD
Andrew P. Creighton, DO
George Cyril MD, FAAPMR
Stephen G. Geiger, MD
Dara Jones, MD, FAAPMR

Consulting Staff

Rock G. Positano, DPM, MSc, MPH (Podiatric Medicine; Non-Surgical Foot and Ankle)
Rock CJay Positano, DPM (Podiatric Medicine; Non-Surgical Foot and Ankle)

Department of Radiology and Imaging

Chairman

Hollis G. Potter, MD

Radiologist-in-Chief Emerita

Helene Pavlov, MD

Attending Radiologists

Eric A. Bogner, MD (Chief, MSK Computed Tomography)
John A. Carrino, MD (Vice Chairman, Radiology)
Richard J. Herzog, MD (Chief, Teleradiology)
Theodore T. Miller, MD
Douglas N. Mintz, MD
Helene Pavlov, MD
Hollis G. Potter, MD (Chairman, Magnetic Resonance Imaging)
Robert Schneider, MD
Carolyn M. Sofka, MD

Associate Attending Radiologists

Assistant Attending Radiologists

 

Department of Rehabilitation Medicine

 

Источник: https://www.hss.edu/hss-medical-staff.asp

louis edmonds surgery

Find out what's ahead this week on Y&R. Louis' TV career stalled after Dark Shadows was cancelled, as he and some other cast members were typecast in their evil-monster roles. From there, he found success in feature films such as 1967's Come Spy With Me, and the 1970 picture House of Dark Shadows. The Edmonds Surgery Center specializes in outpatient, same-day surgeries. Louis played a gun-wielding assassin named Gunther. Dark Shadows had an ensemble cast who went back in forth in time from the 18th century to the 17th century more than once. Genie Francis returns for "battle of the soul of General Hospital" B&B's Courtney Hope chats her Y&R debut: "I'm very impressed with where they're taking Sally" Y&R welcomes back Tricia Cast as beloved character Nina Webster, DAYS recasts Theo Carver; Cameron Johnson joins soap as Abe's son, Y&R's Christel Khalil on Billy and Lily, moving back from Canada, and more [INTERVIEW], B&B tapes milestone episode, shares gratitude with fans. Near the end of his life, Louis collaborated with New York-based author Craig Hamrick, on Louis' biography, Big Lou. He created the role of Algernon in Ernest in Love, the musical version of Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Ernest. General Hospital alum Hayley Erin marries actor Adam Fergus, Kathleen Gati cast in new series? After radical surgery and radiation treatments, however, he returned to the show. Langley and Phoebe eventually became one of the show's "super couples" - unusual for characters (and actors) over 50. Basking in the spotlight Langley brought to him, Louis developed a cabaret act, which he performed many times in New York City. On Dark Shadows, Louis played Roger Collins, brother of family matriarch Elizabeth Collins Stoddard, who was portrayed by Hollywood screen legend Joan Bennett. On the set, he was frail and could no longer loudly project his once-booming and lyrical voice, so the show's writers gradually gave him less and less to do. Chelsea claims that Adam crossed the line, Y&R TWO SCOOPS: The times in Genoa City, they are a-changin', Eileen Davidson joins Caitlyn Jenner in new sitcom Duke of the Valley, RECAP: The Abbotts say goodbye to Dina on The Young and the Restless, Noemi Gonzalez says she was bullied on social media for ''not being skinny, manufactured, or white enough'', Ozark star Madison Thompson joins The Young and the Restless, Demi Lovato and The Young and the Restless' Max Ehrich call off their engagement. Mr. Edmonds started his career with an appearance in the 1940s series, Studio One. (Most major cast members also played multiple roles.) Along with cast mates, he even achieved immortality on a View-Master reel, a notable pop-culture accomplishment. On Dark Shadows, Mr. Edmonds played no less than six members of the Collins family. Like many of the best stage actors of the 1950s and'60s, he appeared in dramatic anthologies like The U.S. Steel Hour and Hallmark Hall of Fame. Edmonds retired from the show due to ill health after being off contract for several years. Langley dallied with the family maid, Opal Gardner, then played sublimely by Dorothy Lyman. He received Daytime Emmy nominations in 1984, 1985 and 1986. He was best known for his roles in Dark Shadows and All My Children. In those scenes, Louis had almost no lines, and he sadly decided he would never return to Pine Valley, though he was asked back several times. Born in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, Louis was drawn to performing at an early age. [1], Learn how and when to remove this template message, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Louis_Edmonds&oldid=933039563, Disease-related deaths in New York (state), Articles needing additional references from March 2013, All articles needing additional references, Turner Classic Movies person ID same as Wikidata, Internet Off-Broadway Database person ID same as Wikidata, Wikipedia articles with SNAC-ID identifiers, Wikipedia articles with WORLDCATID identifiers, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 29 December 2019, at 17:08. How are you feeling about the rumored cast cuts coming to General Hospital? Like many daytime stars, Louis Edmonds had a career that spanned well beyond the small screen - though he is best remembered for two classic soap roles: AMC's lovable conman Langley Wallingford, and Roger Collins, a dour presence on the monster-packed cult classic Dark Shadows. Louis Stirling Edmonds (September 24, 1923 – March 3, 2001) was an American actor from Baton Rouge, Louisiana.He was best known for his roles in Dark Shadows and All My Children.. Edmonds appeared in the musical Ernest in Love in 1960. He died of respiratory failure on March 3, 2001, in Port Jefferson, New York. Eventually, he merely appeared on episodes featuring big events like weddings and funerals and was given few if any lines, which of course frustrated the actor, who had once enjoyed major, front-burner storylines on the show.

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Источник: https://www.iamgregwilliams.com/docs/z20naz.php?id=louis-edmonds-surgery-d0cb4f

He's No Angel

The duffel bag was big and dark blue, an official Major League Baseball model with an Anaheim Angels logo on the side. As Jim Edmonds held it for the final time, about to drop it into a garbage can in the St. Louis Cardinals' spring training clubhouse, utility infielder Shawon Dunston--thrifty if not sentimental--shouted, "Jim! What are you doing? You should save it."

Edmonds paused for a moment, turned his head toward Dunston and smiled. He then dropped the bag and walked back to his locker, where a brand-new, bright-red Cardinals duffel was already in place, one with Edmonds's number 15 on it. "Hell," he said, "I ain't saving that crap."

First days at the office are generally easy--lots of gladtameetcha's and directions to the coffee machine. It wasn't any different for Edmonds last Saturday, two days after St. Louis acquired the two-time Gold Glove centerfielder from Anaheim for righthanded starter Kent Bottenfield and second baseman Adam Kennedy. Edmonds handled everything smoothly, from a 20-minute tete-a-tete with Mark McGwire ("You'll like it here," said Big Mac. "We've only got one beat writer") to his initial encounters with the media (said Edmonds, repeatedly, "I'm just happy to be here") to his first hit as a Cardinal (a second-inning RBI single to left off the Baltimore Orioles' Calvin Maduro). All that was easy; the hard part will be overcoming the hellish reputation that has dogged him for years. A friendly .300-hitting slugger who signs autographs, produces in the clutch, is accessible to the press, hates to lose...and may be the most unpopular player in the game.

Baseball is a tight community. So tight that shortly after the trade was announced, several St. Louis players approached Mike James, the Cards' reliever and a former Angel, to inquire about their newest teammate. This wasn't an "Is he a gin rummy or dominoes guy?" inquiry. "They wanted to know if all the garbage that's been said about Jim is for real," says James, one of Edmonds's closest friends. "Probably everyone in [this clubhouse] has heard the stuff--that he doesn't play hard, that he's a showoff, that he's not a team player. I told them the truth, that 99 percent of it is totally false."

And the other 1%?

"Nobody," says James, "is perfect."

Edmonds isn't quite sure when his evil reputation began to take shape. Maybe it goes back to the minors, when, despite being a hot five-tool prospect, small-town newspaper columnists took swipes at him: Doesn't try hard enough. Showboat. Loafer. Maybe it was when he was a rookie, in 1993, when veteran Angels mocked Edmonds (mostly behind his back) for his cocky demeanor. Maybe it was his third season when, during a pregame workout, he was embarrassed by a prank former teammates still cackle over (which says more about them than about him). One day earlier Edmonds had made a dazzling catch to save a run and then milked the moment by rolling around on the turf, mitt raised triumphantly. The next day, as Edmonds was stretching on the field, teammate Tony Phillips approached him from behind and placed a ketchup-splattered napkin, made to look like a sanitary napkin, under his legs. "Who's the pretty boy!" Phillips shouted as teammates roared with laughter.

"No question, Jim sometimes has a problem with body language and image," says San Diego Padres third baseman Phil Nevin, Edmonds's friend and Angels teammate in 1998. "People interpret him as being conceited, and it's not the case." Edmonds usually wears his cap backward during workouts, and he runs with a smooth, easy stride. "When I first got to Anaheim," says Nevin, "everyone told me I'd hate Jim because I'm such a hard-nosed guy who cares about winning. Jim is confident, and he has his own way, but he wants to win, too."

That's not always obvious to all his teammates. Two years ago, after the American League West-leading Angels surrendered a four-game lead over the Texas Rangers with a month left in the season, several teammates were furious because of Edmonds's nonchalance. "Jim smiles a lot and is outgoing," shortstop Gary DiSarcina told the Los Angeles Times. "That's his persona. But you can't act like that when you're on the verge of elimination. You can't bounce into the clubhouse without a care in the world when your teammates are bloodied, ticked off and not wanting to go home." That September, as Edmonds batted .340 with five home runs and 20 RBIs, DiSarcina hit .241 with no homers and five RBIs. "What matters is what you do on the field," says Edmonds. "If we're mathematically out of it on Aug. 1, I'm not going to come in the next day and want to kill myself. If you treat it like that, that's when you have a problem playing the game."

Last spring training was the worst for Edmonds. For three years he had played with a sore right shoulder, but he says that while there was pain from time to time, it was never bad enough to consider an operation. Then, three days before the season began, Edmonds was bench-pressing in the Edison Field weight room when--pop!--he tore the labrum in his right shoulder. "I was devastated," says Edmonds, who has been on the disabled list four times in his career. "I felt I was letting the team down." Shortly after the injury, when Edmonds learned that he needed surgery and would miss at least four months, he told the Times's Mike DiGiovanna that his shoulder had been bothering him for several years. When DiGiovanna put that in his story, some Angels fumed. First baseman Mo Vaughn tore into Edmonds, saying, "Jim Edmonds is one of the most talented guys I've ever played with. The responsibility is what's in question."

Edmonds was hurt and furious. On April 20, while the Angels were in Toronto, he telephoned the SkyDome press box from his home in California. He asked for DiGiovanna, chewed out the writer and then threatened him, saying, "I'll kick your ass!"

Several Angels, including Vaughn, now concede that they didn't fully understand Edmonds's situation, that they mistakenly thought that he had selfishly put off surgery. "Nothing," says Edmonds, "could be further from the truth."

Edmonds missed all but 55 games last season, batting .250 with five home runs. He came back on Aug. 2, when the Angels were 17 1/2 games out and in last place, even though Edmonds says team doctors told him not to return if the Angels were out of contention. "I felt like I had to test it out and see what I could do," says Edmonds. "I owed it to the team."

This off-season Edmonds tried to ignore the machine-gun fire of trade rumors that, until last week, had laid siege to his life. Edmonds was raised in Diamond Bar, Calif., just an hour's drive from Anaheim. Playing for the Angels, he says, was a dream. "I gave my all to that team, whether people believe it or not," says Edmonds, who has hit .290 with 121 home runs and 408 RBIs in seven seasons. "I've never known why they tried so hard to get rid of me." One minute he was going to the Oakland A's, the next to the New York Yankees. Or the Colorado Rockies. Or the New York Mets. The low point came in early February, when numerous media outlets reported that Edmonds was headed to the Seattle Mariners as part of a three-way trade that would have sent Ken Griffey Jr. to the Cincinnati Reds. When the "deal" never occurred--says Anaheim general manager Bill Stoneman, "We were never involved in [discussions about] a three-way deal with Seattle and Cincinnati"--and Griffey was traded to the Reds for centerfielder Mike Cameron and three others, reporters wrote that Edmonds had refused to play for the Mariners. "I swear to god, I never said anything like that," says Edmonds, who is making $4.7 million in the last season of a five-year contract. "The only thing I ever said was, I don't want to make a decision about signing a long-term contract right now. I've played three games at Safeco Field. How could I make a decision? Hell, I hadn't even been traded."

Edmonds, a slow talker, has picked up the pace. His blue eyes become angry slits. Four lines crease his forehead. "I've heard everything I was supposed to have said--that I was afraid to replace Griffey, that I don't want to play there because the ball won't carry." Edmonds glances at a clubhouse table, where a copy of Baseball America rests. In an issue published after the Griffey trade, columnist Peter Gammons wrote that the Mariners may have been more interested in obtaining Angels outfielder Garret Anderson than Edmonds because Edmonds "continues to insist that he won't sign a long-term contract in Seattle because it's cold and damp."

"I never in my life have said that," says Edmonds, who--in the pursuit of a peaceful winter--declined all interview requests in the off-season. "For Gammons to print that and not ever talk to me is just totally ridiculous. That's the hardest thing to take. Once a rumor gets rolling, it seems like it's a snowball. It makes it easier for other people to say stuff." (Gammons, who admits he did not call Edmonds, says, "I think Jim is a good player. But Jim probably knows that [former teammates] Gary DiSarcina and Darin Erstad don't like him, and he probably thinks that I'm siding with them.")

There was no player more in need of a fresh start than Edmonds, which is why, shortly after Stoneman told him of the trade last Thursday, Edmonds began weeping. That outburst was fueled by several emotions, including the joy of a new start and the sorrow of impending separation. He left the Angels' spring training complex a short time later, then returned early the next morning to bid farewell to Anderson, his closest friend. As the two hugged, Edmonds again cried. When he joined the Cards on Saturday, his eyes still red, he began to speak of Angels rightfielder Tim Salmon, who had strongly defended him on Thursday, saying he was such a natural talent that people incorrectly assumed he wasn't playing hard. "I appreciated that so much," said Edmonds, taking deep breaths, trying to stay composed. "For Tim to speak up for me...god, I haven't been this emotional in a long time." Edmonds began to bend the rim of his new red cap. "I just hope to fit in here, show that I can help us win."

Minutes later he was in manager Tony La Russa's office, being told, essentially, that the past is the past and reputations mean nothing. As soon as the deal was concluded, La Russa moved centerfielder J.D. Drew to right and placed Eric Davis (still recovering from off-season shoulder surgery) on the bench to make way for Edmonds in center. Unwanted on a team that will most likely finish in the American League West cellar, Edmonds is suddenly a key component in one of the more potent lineups in baseball. He is, at last, wanted.

"I don't know Jim much," says Cardinals leftfielder Ray Lankford, "but I'll tell you this: If he's the player everyone says he is, and he hustles and works his butt off, nobody will care what they said about him in Anaheim. That's old news. He's not an Angel anymore. This is a new day. Jim's a Cardinal."

Источник: https://vault.si.com

1 Replies to “Louis edmonds surgery”

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